24 seconds of flight time

2lumpy

Long Time Member
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So……… how many hit in a 12” and a 24” circle. 4.4 miles is a dang lone way.

How many different principals of physics have to be considered when hitting that target.

Wind, temperature, air pressure, day of the year, rotation of the earth, spin speed of the bullet………. Others?

I think it’s pretty interesting, from a science, mathematics, problem solving perspective. From a science approach it’s not a lot different than the challenge of the long range military’s howitzers hitting small target, many miles away.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
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608
Found it:
1663586131675.png
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
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So the average speed of the bullet was 968 per second. (23,232 feet divided by 24 seconds equal 968.) For you math specialists, if the starting feet per second was 3,300, what was the speed of the bullet when it hit the bulls eye?

Second, how many inches/feet of drop was there at 4.4 miles/23,232 feet?
 

Homer

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So the average speed of the bullet was 968 per second. (23,232 feet divided by 24 seconds equal 968.) For you math specialists, if the starting feet per second was 3,300, what was the speed of the bullet when it hit the bulls eye?

Second, how many inches/feet of drop was there at 4.4 miles/23,232 feet?
look at the scope mount base.....wow
 

Zeke

Long Time Member
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Not much different from the dedication in the race car industry. Lots of people doing sh!t that doesn't translate directly to the real world but the tech trickles down over time.

Obviously there's a degree of luck with that bullet strike since a 1/2 MOA rifle can only shoot 77" groups at that range, at best!

Zeke
 

Zeke

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Oops, sorry.

77" is MOA not half MOA at 4.4 miles but really, what the difference? Still an element of luck with that 69th shot.
 

2lumpy

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5,598
Bullet hole still like the bullet is stable and not tumbling.

What would the parabola arch look like with a initial bullet speed of 3,400 fps.
 

2lumpy

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Looked like a 1/2” hole…..I doubt a 50 left that fast…
Me too, I was thinking 3,000 or less but just ducking around for a worse case estimate. Some where I think I read a typical .300 would drop about 24 to 26 feet in a mile. Just trying to get an idea what kind of angle hold over those boys were using. Maybe the target was a 300 feet below the muzzle. I’m just guessing that that bullet hit at a 45 angle or more.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
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I think way more than 300 feet. In 24 seconds, the drop would be close to one mile. Gravity works the same on bullets!

Here is an example with a 3000 fps muzzle velocity bullet with a high BC taking about 24 seconds:

1663628382839.png
 
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HikeHunt61

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Towards the end of the flight path, the bullet is dropping nearly as fast as it is going vertical. At least per the example above.
 

2lumpy

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Towards the end of the flight path, the bullet is dropping nearly as fast as it is going vertical. At least per the example above.
I was wondering if gravity might be causing it to be accelerating again but I figured if that was the case it would be tumbling which it doesn’t look like it was.

Obviously I’m no physicist. Can hardly balance my check book…….. according to my banker.
 

2lumpy

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...the gravity acceleration was constant from the time it left the barrel.....
Is that true? If they held one barrel at a 80 degree and another barrel at a 35 degree angle, would both bullets hit the ground at the same time.

It would seem as if the forward motion of the 80 degree bullet would almost stop moving forward but it’s downward speed would begin to accelerate. Would the downward speed ever exceed the forward speed or would that be impossible in the world of physics?
 

2lumpy

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Yep……. I’m confused.

Still a he!! of a drop to get something to stay airborne for 24 seconds, I guess they could still see the target at 4.4 miles in their scope, with that 2x4 ramp under the scope.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
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608
Gravity pulls it consistently from the angle it is traveling. So if its traveling up, it goes "less" up. It's time dependent- so from a distance perspective as the bullet slows down, the travel towards earth increases.
 

2lumpy

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Gravity pulls it consistently from the angle it is traveling. So if its traveling up, it goes "less" up. It's time dependent- so from a distance perspective as the bullet slows down, the travel towards earth increases.
Make sense.
 

JPickett

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How did they zero that scope mounted like that? To me that’s more impressive then the 69 try’s to hit the target
 

JPickett

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I can’t even start figure out the process of sighting that in. I’m sure I’m missing something
 

HikeHunt61

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Ya- that is pretty crazy to think about. I'm surprised the scope didn't have to be mounted at an even higher angle. But then again- what are those devices on the front of the scope?
 

Homer

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line of sight crosses the bore at about the muzzle break......very brave down range spotters at 5-7000 yards out calling hits I guess...
 

JPickett

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Ya- that is pretty crazy to think about. I'm surprised the scope didn't have to be mounted at an even higher angle. But then again- what are those devices on the front of the scope?
Best guess. The angle of that scope looks like the barrels pretty much right in the line of sight. So, mirrors? Now tell me how to zero that damn thing !!!
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
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Best guess. The angle of that scope looks like the barrels pretty much right in the line of sight. So, mirrors? Now tell me how to zero that damn thing !!!
I like your guess. Might even have been a kluge after miscalculating the approximate angle/height of the scope mount. If they had gotten close with the existing mount, but were just barely pointed into the muzzle after copious honing in- they chose to extend the objective view with mirrors/lenses rather than start over with a higher mount.
 

HikeHunt61

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But zeroing in is the least of their problem. No matter how calm the wind/airflow was, the deflection caused by just 1 mph airflow would have been many, many feet at 7700 yards. And even if they could accurately measure the airflow at 20 intervals before the shot, airflow would change from the time they measured it, calculated it and fired. Then over 24 seconds, there would be more very slight changes in airflows over the bullet path. If they were perfectly zeroed in, it would take 69 shots to get lucky enough for the actual airflows to match wherever they aimed.

Mindboggling...
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
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But zeroing in is the least of their problem. No matter how calm the wind/airflow was, the deflection caused by just 1 mph airflow would have been many, many feet at 7700 yards. And even if they could accurately measure the airflow at 20 intervals before the shot, airflow would change from the time they measured it, calculated it and fired. Then over 24 seconds, there would be more very slight changes in airflows over the bullet path. If they were perfectly zeroed in, it would take 69 shots to get lucky enough for the actual airflows to match wherever they aimed.

Mindboggling...
It is mind boggling, two years of effort, calculations and experimentation. Even thought I would not understand much of it I would like to read a list of all the variables they used to get it done. Maybe some day they publish a list. I respect their effort even though they seemed to admit it probably isn’t repeatable on a first shot basis.
 

elkantlers

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“Together, we’ve spent over 1,500 hours in research, highs and lows, blood, sweat, excitement and tears, with dozens of amazingly gifted people and businesses personally invested in the goal,” Austin said.


Just think if they would have used that amount of time and resources to do something that is actually beneficial. What a waste of time...
 

Zeke

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“Together, we’ve spent over 1,500 hours in research, highs and lows, blood, sweat, excitement and tears, with dozens of amazingly gifted people and businesses personally invested in the goal,” Austin said.


Just think if they would have used that amount of time and resources to do something that is actually beneficial. What a waste of time...
Oh you mean like shooting or hunting? haha

Unless we're at our jobs or with family, it's all just for entertainment or personal satisfaction (bragging rights).

It's not something to which I aspire but I certainly understand the and marvel at the undertaking.

Zeke
 

HikeHunt61

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Oh you mean like shooting or hunting? haha

Unless we're at our jobs or with family, it's all just for entertainment or personal satisfaction (bragging rights).

It's not something to which I aspire but I certainly understand the and marvel at the undertaking.

Zeke
Good point. Considering, for example, there are people who spend their lives "curling", this seems like a great use of time.
 

2lumpy

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5,598
Good point. Considering, for example, there are people who spend their lives "curling", this seems like a great use of time.
Easy there Michelangelo, coming from the land of horse shoes, shuffleboard, bocce, darts, testicle toss, corn hole, and countless other games of physical endurance and intellectual enlightenment, curling’s not for the passive nor those in need of back or shoulder surgery.

I’d like to see you play a little yard bocce when it’s -30 F and there’s a foot of snow on the ground. 😁
 

2lumpy

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So…… because I’m too dumb to solve problems the traditional way, with mathematics and physics, I have to use other means.

I decide where my bullet needed to land, at 4.4 miles, put out the spotters, and start walking my shots into the distance by aiming at the same left and right direction, keep elevating each shot until the bullets started hitting around the 4.4 mile area. Then I’d lock the rifle into a vice, and move the target to that spot. Don’t need to sight it in, just lock it down and set the target where it’s landing.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
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608
Easy there Michelangelo, coming from the land of horse shoes, shuffleboard, bocce, darts, testicle toss, corn hole, and countless other games of physical endurance and intellectual enlightenment, curling’s not for the passive nor those in need of back or shoulder surgery.

I’d like to see you play a little yard bocce when it’s -30 F and there’s a foot of snow on the ground. 😁
When I was a kid in Wyoming, dad would take me out to the draws in the sagelands to shoot jack rabbits off hand - IN FREAKING JANUARY. Told me it would teach me to shoot, and build character. I'm a character alright...
 

notdonhunting

Very Active Member
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1,505
So…… because I’m too dumb to solve problems the traditional way, with mathematics and physics, I have to use other means.

I decide where my bullet needed to land, at 4.4 miles, put out the spotters, and start walking my shots into the distance by aiming at the same left and right direction, keep elevating each shot until the bullets started hitting around the 4.4 mile area. Then I’d lock the rifle into a vice, and move the target to that spot. Don’t need to sight it in, just lock it down and set the target where it’s landing.
Good old Central Utah ingenuity.
Kind of like hunting geese, you can keep putting out decoys and try and get the geese to come to your side of the field no luck but if you moved to their side of the field you get your daily bag.
A guy that has passed away a year ago (I am sure you new him 2lumpy) would always get his bag limit when he went out hunting geese. Me and my friend would go out and get a solo goose he would tell us "hunt where the geese are not where you want them to be"

I kind of agree with hikehunt61 the wind thing trips me up, you can calculate variables you do know (bullet drop, coriolis affect, spin drift) but what you cant guarantee, I supposed they only shot on really calm mornings.
I don't know maybe I am way off.
But I did think it is a pretty cool accomplishment.
 

BIGJOHNT

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2lumpy

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That give a few more details. Tks homer
 

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