A Zone Rifle Opener this Saturday!!!

Buckhunter1955

Active Member
Messages
634
Good luck to all this week end. It's going to be hot as hell, but our group has been getting together for the opener for 30+ years. It started with just my brother and myself with a couple good friends and has grown to include sons and a future daughter in law. I'll try to add to my collection of "Bone".

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2016 opening weekend.jpg
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,661
For the longest time I would tell people that the "Old Timers" called that type of buck a "Pacific Buck". I'm almost 66 now and I've become the Old Timer. I'll do my best to take his photo by the Redwood Tree.
I'm an "old timer" from Humboldt Co. Born and raised here. 72 now. I was logging those old growth Redwood trees back in the 1960's.
 

Buckhunter1955

Active Member
Messages
634
Eel, I'm your neighbor to the south, Mendocino Co. I too worked in the woods, 2 years setting chokers on a yarder for Masonite, and 10 years falling timber mostly in yarder ground. I got out of the woods in 1989 and have been growing wine grapes for the past 32+ years in the Anderson Valley. We have killed several "Pacific Bucks" over the years.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,661
Buckhunter1955, I worked for Simpson from 1968 to 1973 setting chokers, working on the landing and running Cat for the last year. You timber fallers have my utmost respect. A tough dangerous job. Then I worked 31 years in a sawmill in Eureka as a saw filer.
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
Messages
6,226
Buckhunter1955, I worked for Simpson from 1968 to 1973 setting chokers, working on the landing and running Cat for the last year. You timber fallers have my utmost respect. A tough dangerous job. Then I worked 31 years in a sawmill in Eureka as a saw filer.
Are you sh!ttin' me -- 31 yrs. filing saw teeth????? 😲
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,661
Are you sh!ttin' me -- 31 yrs. filing saw teeth????? 😲
Every saw filer starts out as a fitter, and the fitter is the one who actually sharpens the saws. The saw filer supervises the fitter. The filer benches the saws prior to sharpening. Benching means leveling and tensioning the saws. Both band saws and round saws need to be tensioned so they run true when up to rpm. (it gets complicated). A good benchman is hard to find. It's almost an art.

The best way to describe what a saw filer does would be to give you an example. Every sawmill cuts lumber over size to start out with and the lumber is then sent through the planer which planes the lumber to a standard finished size.

If something goes wrong and the rough lumber comes out too big or too small, it's the saw filer's job to figure out why and fix it. That involves checking the saws to make sure they're right. (I could write a book on that alone). If the saws are right then you look at the machine centers up in the mill. You look for worn guides, guide pressure, worn bearings, feed tables, band saw strain, band saw wheels and tracking. It's the filer's job to work with the maintenance crew to get it fixed.

When things are running smooth it's a great job. When there's a problem, the pressure mounts.
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
Messages
6,226
If the saws are right then you look at the machine centers up in the mill. You look for worn guides, guide pressure, worn bearings, feed tables, band saw strain, band saw wheels and tracking. It's the filer's job to work with the maintenance crew to get it fixed.
 

12pointer

Active Member
Messages
331
I'm an "old timer" from Humboldt Co. Born and raised here. 72 now. I was logging those old growth Redwood trees back in the 1960's.
Small world, my Father was logging those Redwoods in the late 40s. I've got 8mm silent movies of Him on a dozer.

My Grandfather owned 1500 acres 2 miles south of Laytonville on highway 101, 1000 acres on the west side of the highway and 500 on the east side. When my father got married it couldn't support 2 families so He went to work logging.

Grandfather sold the west side in the early 50s and gave the 500 acres to my Uncle, He sold it to Bud Sloan in 69.

I wish it would have stayed in the Family, had great black tail hunting.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,661
Small world, my Father was logging those Redwoods in the late 40s. I've got 8mm silent movies of Him on a dozer.

My Grandfather owned 1500 acres 2 miles south of Laytonville on highway 101, 1000 acres on the west side of the highway and 500 on the east side. When my father got married it couldn't support 2 families so He went to work logging.

Grandfather sold the west side in the early 50s and gave the 500 acres to my Uncle, He sold it to Bud Sloan in 69.

I wish it would have stayed in the Family, had great black tail hunting.
I imagine those ranches have turkey and elk on them now too. I almost always see both when driving through. Laytonville is a cool place.
 

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