California fires

heywouldya

Very Active Member
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1,025
Anyone on here effected by the Carr fire or other fires in the state? This stuff is getting crazy!!

hwy
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
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27,685
56 degrees and high fog in Eureka. People better move here before the next 10.5 earthquake hits.

95% of forest fires are started by humans. We better learn to be more fire conscious otherwise we're all doomed.
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,025
BOHNTR, thank your son for his service! Our department has a strike team on the Carr fire, and it looks like they have their hands full!

hwy
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
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1,025
Agreed eelgrass! The Carr fire was started, well, by a broken down vehicle. Another fire near hwy 505 was started by a improperly installed electric fence. Not sure how the rest started. Better range management would sure help out the "golden state" with these fires.
We're a month early for fire season, this year is going to be one for the record books!!

hwy
 

Bumpy

Member
Messages
59
?We're a month early for fire season.? Month early? The way things have been going here the past several years I'd have to say fire season starts in January and ends in December.
The Thomas fire in Ventura/Santa Barbara counties started December 4th and officially out January 12th.
I'm sure if one took the time to research, there have been wildfires in every month of the year.
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
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1,025
For our fire department in northern California, the fire season is a month early. Southern California is a different animal all together. There is actually a different "official" fire season for counties in southern California than those in the rest of the state.
We have green grass and rain in December, so no fire danger then. Let me know how the research goes on the months when fire hazards are the highest and which months more fires happen. We are off to the worst start in over a decade!
However, the purpose of my original post was to see how others on this link were effected by the fires and if there is anything we can do to help.

hwy
 

Gator

Long Time Member
Messages
17,367
How the city of Redding is it close to one of the fires.

"I have found if you go the extra mile it's Never crowded".
>[Font][Font color = "green"]Life member of
>the MM green signature club.[font/]
 

nocal

Active Member
Messages
483
100K ac burnt, 600+ residences gone, 6 lives lost, 7 unaccounted for. It is still here in Shasta Co's face! Also burnt west along 299 over top of buckhorn to Trinity Co., & So in Igo/Ono area.

Perhaps take a look at Cal Fire sight for Carr Fire.
 

6x7

Very Active Member
Messages
1,420
>?We're a month early for fire
>season.? Month early? The way
>things have been going here
>the past several years I'd
>have to say fire season
>starts in January and ends
>in December.
>The Thomas fire in Ventura/Santa Barbara
>counties started December 4th and
>officially out January 12th.
>I'm sure if one took the
>time to research, there have
>been wildfires in every month
>of the year.

So cal burns year around unlike up north
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,025
nocal, I've been following that fire and the others near Clear Lake on Cal Fire. They've done a descent job keeping it updated. These darn fires are flat out monsters!

hwy
 

Soj51hopeful

Very Active Member
Messages
1,003
I hope people start realizing we can take preventative measures against these mega fires. Lots of logging and big swaths of bare ground maintained fire lines around rural communities. The damn sierra club and other hippy groups should be blamed and sued for these conditions.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,079
We all know that deer love a burn, and I would expect that local hunting will improve in the area affected over the next few years. In the long run, however, where large landowners manage forests to prevent wildfire, the typical result is even-aged stands of pine that have little value to wildlife. Deer eat acorns and oak leaves, not pine cones. From the perspective of those who hunt, it is important that rehabilitation efforts include steps to benefit wildlife--or at least efforts to avoid harming them--rather than simply cover the hillsides with greenery. It is important that hunters resist efforts to treat hillsides with chemical herbicides, as is frequently the case on large private timber holdings. While we should respect a landowner's title to his own property, we should also remember that the wildlife on his lands belong to all of us.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,685
>What are the laws regarding hunting
>burns in CA? Obviously can't
>hunt closures, do you know
>beyond that?

You can only hunt burns in California if you're over 60 and a resident.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,685
>>What are the laws regarding hunting
>>burns in CA? Obviously can't
>>hunt closures, do you know
>>beyond that?
>
>You can only hunt burns in
>California if you're over 60
>and a resident.

I should have put :D as there are no regulations against hunting burns. Check with the property owner if you're on private land.
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,025
bullskin,
I'm not really sure where you are going with thus in regards to the California fires. The ranches that are burning near us are managed for cattle not trees. The "forest" companies are mostly in northern California. The BLM ground in the rest of the state is overgrown brush that has been mismanaged for decades. And yes, the overgrown brush does not provide the deer the feed they need, and these fires will be good for them, but not good for the people who's houses are burning up.
In the big picture of things, there is a direct correlation of poorly managed federal lands and the deer herd. The decline of management burns since the 1950's and the decline in the mule deer herd are directly related. Like you stated, the deer need new growth for feed, not old brush and trees.

hwy
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,025
That's funny stuff eel! You're correct, but typically the same year of the burn things will be closed, however the following year they are usually opened back up to the public.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,079
heywouldya,

I am referring to fires in Northern California, where Sierra Pacific sprays oak and other broadleaf plants in order to improve growth in their pine plantations. In the forty-six thousand acre Fountain Fire burn there is now nothing but pine, except along the highway (which was not sprayed) where the deer now necessarily congregate in the evenings to browse and be struck by vehicles. More recently, SP sprayed their pine plantations near Hat Creek and killed all of the oak that had begun to regenerate. It used to be full of deer. Now there are none. There is a stark difference in vegetation where SP property meets Forest Services lands in this burn. The Federal lands have not been sprayed and every deer in the area has been forced onto them in order to find food. Granted, without attention, these will become dense thickets that will offer little hunting opportunity in a decade or two, but for now at least they are keeping our deer alive where they would otherwise starve. My complaint about private management is in no manner meant to condone the poor job done by Federal Agencies. Unfortunately, most people seem not to notice the difference. They see young pine trees growing and assume that the ecosystem is in repair. In reality, it might was well be a stand of telephone poles. Most hunters in my area are quick to criticize poor cougar management, but are completely oblivious to the larger picture. One would think that the Department of Fish and Game, which provides authorization to logging plans, would demand better rehabilitation on behalf of wildlife and hunters, but they appear clueless. As long as hunters are unaware of these practices, I have no doubt that DFG will continue to take the path of least resistance in this regard.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,685
I'm not that familiar with Sierra Pacific's reforestation practices but the last two blacktails I've taken in the last 4 years have been on SP land. They are generally open to hunting, walk in only. I saw no evidence of spraying. They own a lot of land though and I've only been on a small fraction of it in Trinity Co. One property I hunted got so overgrown with brush it's impossible to hunt now.

I think now days most big timber companies hire full time wildlife biologists not only to keep F&W off their backs, but because they see the value to wildlife and public relations, at least more so now than in the past. Let's hope that continues.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,079
LAST EDITED ON Aug-07-18 AT 08:11AM (MST)[p]I hope so too. And I have appreciated this, along with hundreds if not thousands of others. Lately, though, I am not sure SP feels the same way. They recently closed much of the Battle area to hunting. In light of the Moonlight Incident (which unfairly cost them millions), I don't blame SP for exercising greater control over access to its properties, but where management practices impact wildlife, then the public deserves some input. I am concerned that no such input has been provided or heard.
 

Soj51hopeful

Very Active Member
Messages
1,003
Bullskin I have seen what you are talking about down here on SP land as well after the rim fire. But I would say they didn't do property corner to corner. They came in and deep ripped the soil then planted large areas of just pine, but not entirely all their property. I don't know the exact numbers but just for a reference I would say out of a 500 acre chunk of land they planted 300 acres. I'm sure each region is managed slightly different so maybe we are seeing 2 different things.
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,025
I spent the last few years up in southern Oregon and in Modoc on Collins Forest company. I was tons of deer in there and plenty of undergrowth for feed. They were also open to hunting. as long as you ask for permission.
As for the 300,000 acre fire in my back yard, I cannot stress enough that the state has failed us miserably. Decades of overgrown brush, no grazing, and poor forest management has left us with tons of fuel for fires and no way to manage them. Honestly in many of those areas, herbicide application would have been great, so old brush could die, and new brush could come back the following year. I'm just not sure how any aerial applications of tricloyr can be economically applied, and be out of threat of legal issues.
That's just my opinion, for what its worth.

hwy
 

Dmmallia21

Member
Messages
12
It?d be so nice if the enviro whackos would not file a lawsuit every time the federal government tries to do a timber sale. I'd love to see full scale selective timber harvesting on the National Forests. It's be a win-win on so many different levels and for so many different reasons.

The FS gets sued when they try to do a salvage timber sale on burned ground. It's insane.
 

Smacked

Active Member
Messages
202
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The whole West is on fire.
Smacked
 

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