Christensen Arms expanding L/H offerings.

Boskee

Long Time Member
Good news for lefty's! Christensen Arms is going to expand the line up in left hand calibers in the Mesa and Ridgeline models. New calibers are 6.5PRC, 300PRC, 300Win. Mag and 28 Nosler. This should give everyone a chance to own something other than just standard left hand fare and given their pricing it's a nice alternative to the custom gun market at a more affordable price point.
 

3TOE

Active Member
I own a Ridgeline chambered in 300WSM & it’s a shooter. I’m right handed myself but it’s cool to see they are adapting & improving on their offerings. 👍🏻
 

Boskee

Long Time Member
I agree with the discrimination for being wrong...eyed so i'm really a mess since I shoot a bow and gun from the wrong side and so does my wife.

Now from working in the gun business I see things from a different perspective. It's hard to get dealers to stock wrong handed guns because of the limited customer base and tying up his $$ on a gun that may sit for a while. Then factor in a guy wants what a guy wants and it makes things more complex because what he has may not fill the bill and given the cost of the weapon it's not always easy to just buy it.

From the production side having to make parts and actions and carry inventory as a manufacturer also presents some issues with your capital and machine time to make chips. It also adds delays in your production schedule and work flow since it requires set up and more parts to keep track of in the process. Using outside vendors for treating or making parts further complicates the process. You may have a left hand trigger available today and if not you have to wait for their next production run. So it's not as easy as we think it is in many regards and there's plenty of other reasons why they inflate the cost.

Now to the good news with companies dropping out of the business and other factors it's nice to see a company step up and expand their line up and offerings.

BUT it only be there if we utilize it!

Other companies have made runs and completely stopped making left handed guns. So our choices evaporate as the sales numbers don't support making them. So guys If you're in the market for a new gun take a look at what they're offering. They're nicely machined, work well and have some quality materials in their production and nice fit and finish, at a fairly decent price point and some good configurations for hunting or target shooting. They also are accurate and are built for the long haul. They come with removable muzzle brakes and are decent weights for hunting. It's a step up from many guns we all own today and offer a great value for the price as opposed to a custom gun that will cost far more but still offer advantages that are hard to quantify for some but not others. It's another choice and for those of us that suffer from limited opportunity it's nice to have a good option to consider and one that will out shoot many of the guns we already own.....so what's not to like.
 

3TOE

Active Member
I agree with the discrimination for being wrong...eyed so i'm really a mess since I shoot a bow and gun from the wrong side and so does my wife.

Now from working in the gun business I see things from a different perspective. It's hard to get dealers to stock wrong handed guns because of the limited customer base and tying up his $$ on a gun that may sit for a while. Then factor in a guy wants what a guy wants and it makes things more complex because what he has may not fill the bill and given the cost of the weapon it's not always easy to just buy it.

From the production side having to make parts and actions and carry inventory as a manufacturer also presents some issues with your capital and machine time to make chips. It also adds delays in your production schedule and work flow since it requires set up and more parts to keep track of in the process. Using outside vendors for treating or making parts further complicates the process. You may have a left hand trigger available today and if not you have to wait for their next production run. So it's not as easy as we think it is in many regards and there's plenty of other reasons why they inflate the cost.

Now to the good news with companies dropping out of the business and other factors it's nice to see a company step up and expand their line up and offerings.

BUT it only be there if we utilize it!

Other companies have made runs and completely stopped making left handed guns. So our choices evaporate as the sales numbers don't support making them. So guys If you're in the market for a new gun take a look at what they're offering. They're nicely machined, work well and have some quality materials in their production and nice fit and finish, at a fairly decent price point and some good configurations for hunting or target shooting. They also are accurate and are built for the long haul. They come with removable muzzle brakes and are decent weights for hunting. It's a step up from many guns we all own today and offer a great value for the price as opposed to a custom gun that will cost far more but still offer advantages that are hard to quantify for some but not others. It's another choice and for those of us that suffer from limited opportunity it's nice to have a good option to consider and one that will out shoot many of the guns we already own.....so what's not to like.
I completely understand & agree with everything you said.
That being said... I did something to my son that was completely messed up. He was clearly left handed when he was young, but as yourself he was “wrong eyed” also. I bought him a right handed small compound when he was 5 or 6 years old so he could shoot in archery tournaments with me. From there his first rifle & shotgun were NEF single shots. Today at 25 years old he shoots right handed & does everything else with his left. He’s never even fired a left handed gun & at this point, I would assume it would be uncomfortable to him.
 

Boskee

Long Time Member
That's certainly one way to do things and many do it that way. Craig Boddington is left handed but shoots more right handed guns in his job and can use them quite well and that bolt handle being on the wrong side doesn't slow him down a bit. My wife and I both shot competitive archery for several companies for years and there's a big advantage holding a bow with your strong arm to shoot. So doing things the way you're naturally set up can have it's advantages too. The good part is you found a way that worked for him to enjoy the activity and managed to adapt to make it work for him. One of the great things about us we can adapt to many things if given the time and effort to do it. Starting him early paid off well for you and that's key to making this work better in many ways. Improvise and overcome have always been a good formula in hunting and you sure made that work! It's natural for him now and that's a win, win.
 

Captain_coues

Active Member
This should work out well for Christensen. I’ve heard the buzz about the new offerings from many different places. It’s nice to see a company make things for left handers even though they won’t make that many. It at least looks like they care about both types of shooters and that impresses me. I would like to throw them a bone, but I’m all rifled up for now.
 

Butts

Active Member
I’m definitely going to take a look!! I’m left eye dominant and only have 1 rifle that’s actually a lefty and I love it! (Savage 110 tactical).
It is cool to see a little more options out there!
 

bodhi

Member
I'm a lefty but shoot right handed guns. I was taught as a kid to practice looking at objects and pulling up my gun to be right on it with the scope (probably good practice for any new hunters). I can do this pretty fast with a second shot since i typically drop the gun down to chamber another round for a right handed bolt. at this point, I'm not sure how a left handed gun would feel since I've been using a right handed bolt for all my life. either way, not paying the extra $300 but good to see more options for us lefties.
 

Butts

Active Member
That's certainly one way to do things and many do it that way. Craig Boddington is left handed but shoots more right handed guns in his job and can use them quite well and that bolt handle being on the wrong side doesn't slow him down a bit. My wife and I both shot competitive archery for several companies for years and there's a big advantage holding a bow with your strong arm to shoot. So doing things the way you're naturally set up can have it's advantages too. The good part is you found a way that worked for him to enjoy the activity and managed to adapt to make it work for him. One of the great things about us we can adapt to many things if given the time and effort to do it. Starting him early paid off well for you and that's key to making this work better in many ways. Improvise and overcome have always been a good formula in hunting and you sure made that work! It's natural for him now and that's a win, win.
I’m left eye dominant and shot archery and rifles for 15 years right handed. I cannot believe the difference in switching over to left handed bows and rifles(with time just felt more natural). in 2014. I didn’t know any better cause I do allot of functions right handed. Crazy difference in accuracy and confidence.
 

Captain_coues

Active Member
I’m left eye dominant and shot archery and rifles for 15 years right handed. I cannot believe the difference in switching over to left handed bows and rifles(with time just felt more natural). in 2014. I didn’t know any better cause I do allot of functions right handed. Crazy difference in accuracy and confidence.
I’m naturally right handed but left eye dominant. Learning to shoot, my dad got my first left handed bolt rifle, a .270 A-Bolt. Before that, I was young and used a Chipmunk. Once I got into archery, I got a left hand PSE in about 1991 and kind of taught myself as dad wasn’t into that. I found being right hand dominant, pistols felt better in my right hand. I started using my left hand and it’s like you said, all kinds of accuracy showed up. I still practice with both hands for pistols, but left hand is where it at for me.
 

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