Closing Northern California to hunting

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,044
I hope you're right but the Dixie fire seems to be alive and well. Sept. 11th.


Thursday's was quite a run, and produced a smoke column to match. But the rains came later that night--hard and steady for hours. I did not measure them myself, but I heard an unofficial report from the Big Springs area that measured two inches. We have had blue skies since then. Fingers crossed.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,044
who thinks that computer generated voice is appealing???
This sounds like a report that might have been generated on Thursday. If there has been a run since then, then I am unaware of it. I expected that the moisture would slow things for at least a few days. If not, then I guess that is why I do not get to play IC. I hope that I am not way off base...
 

Calbuck

Active Member
Messages
111
Smoke from the fire is way down today. Temps fairly cool. Went out and saw a handful of deer. Chased a forked horn around and got to 48 yards but no shot. Not a soul in the woods. Best hunting conditions I've experienced.
 

marburg

Active Member
Messages
749
Tahoe fire was started by some wacked out lady in a bikini. Maybe bikini bans are next..
.say it ain't so.
 

Rie bread

Member
Messages
42
well it was a fun archery season despite with the limited access. learned a lot and gonna work on the long shots. fingers crossed for the national forests open up for rifle.
 

Snoopdogg

Very Active Member
Messages
1,821
Tahoe fire was started by some wacked out lady in a bikini. Maybe bikini bans are next..
.say it ain't so.
She started one off of 50 after Caldor was already rolling but it didn't get big because of the fire boys already being there. Seemed to have a little bit of a meth issue if I remember. correctly.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,044
I am certainly not defending California....but you do understand that National Forests and BLM is managed by the feds....right??

and.....when and where were "millions" of acres sprayed??
I just realized that the point made about Federal management might also be directed toward my comment. And, yes, I do understand that the Feds manage their lands. But timber harvest plans also require coordination with state game departments, which gives hunters an "in" when it comes to management. As it turns out, the Feds are the slowest to rehab our lands--in fact, much of it simply returns to brush. Over the short term, I have found the hunting to be much better on these lands than on most of the privately managed timber lands which are treated almost immediately to remove brush.

The Dixie fire presents sportsmen the opportunity to establish a million acre deer smorgasbord. I swear to God, when I retire I am going to make it my remaining life's work to collect boxes of acorns every fall and then take a slingshot along on all of my scouting trips, launching future oak trees into all of the places from which they have been removed. I shall atone for the decades of turkey dinners and venison I have consumed. Until then, I can contact the DFG, USFS and my Congressman to tell them what works for hunters. We all should.
 
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huntindad4

Very Active Member
Messages
2,026
I just realized that the point made about Federal management might also be directed toward my comment. And, yes, I do understand that the Feds manage their lands. But timber harvest plans also require coordination with state game departments, which gives hunters an "in" when it comes to management. As it turns out, the Feds are the slowest to rehab our lands--in fact, much of it simply returns to brush. Over the short term, I have found the hunting to be much better on these lands than on most of the privately managed timber lands which are treated almost immediately to remove brush.

The Dixie fire presents sportsmen the opportunity to establish a million acre deer smorgasbord. I swear to God, when I retire I am going to make it my remaining life's work to collect boxes of acorns every fall and then take a slingshot along on all of my scouting trips, launching future oak trees into all of the places from which they have been removed. I shall atone for the decades of turkey dinners and venison I have consumed. Until then, I can contact the DFG, USFS and my Congressman to tell them what works for hunters. We all should.
That's awesome! Will they grow? It's worth a shot.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,224
I know a guy who gathered up a gunny sack full of acorns, took them home and smashed them up and then hung the sack in a tree to try and bait deer. It didn't work. I'm not sure it was even legal.
 

RELH

Long Time Member
Messages
16,838
Homer I had a friend that worked for the U.S. Forest service and was a big supporter of winter control burns to keep the brush down on federal forest land.
, In CA. the state air quality board made control burns come under their air quality board rules and shut down winter control burns on state and federal forests due to smoke pollution. The feds should have had a backbone and told them to shove their rules applying to federal forest land.
Today in CA. if you want to burn a slash pile on your property that is larger then 4 ft. square, you have to do several things. One is have a fire permit from Cal fire, and it be a burn day. You also must obtain a permit from the CA. air quality board and burn only on the days they advise you that you can. Does not matter that it is a burn day by Cal. fire rules. Oh! almost forgot, that permit from Ca. air quality board will cost you 40 dollars. another way this liberal state steals your money and not call it a tax.

RELH
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,224
Homer I had a friend that worked for the U.S. Forest service and was a big supporter of winter control burns to keep the brush down on federal forest land.
, In CA. the state air quality board made control burns come under their air quality board rules and shut down winter control burns on state and federal forests due to smoke pollution. The feds should have had a backbone and told them to shove their rules applying to federal forest land.
Today in CA. if you want to burn a slash pile on your property that is larger then 4 ft. square, you have to do several things. One is have a fire permit from Cal fire, and it be a burn day. You also must obtain a permit from the CA. air quality board and burn only on the days they advise you that you can. Does not matter that it is a burn day by Cal. fire rules. Oh! almost forgot, that permit from Ca. air quality board will cost you 40 dollars. another way this liberal state steals your money and not call it a tax.

RELH
I've heard that recording many times. "For air quality purposes, today is a no burn day in zone 1".

Ironically, control burns count as official air pollution but wild forest fires do not. That's how they can say California leads the nation in clean air. Sly devils, they are.

I've been very fortunate in that I haven't seen the poor quality hunting on timber company land. It's my understanding that the bigger companies hire their own biologists to ensure water quality and wildlife habitat. At least Green Diamond does.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,044
I've heard that recording many times. "For air quality purposes, today is a no burn day in zone 1".

Ironically, control burns count as official air pollution but wild forest fires do not. That's how they can say California leads the nation in clean air. Sly devils, they are.

I've been very fortunate in that I haven't seen the poor quality hunting on timber company land. It's my understanding that the bigger companies hire their own biologists to ensure water quality and wildlife habitat. At least Green Diamond does.

I am glad to hear that Green Diamond does it right. I wish SP would do the same.

that’s why you make many 4 foot piles. any one find anything on the forests opening ?

I stack my four-foot piles on top of one another, and side-by-side.
 

eelgrass

Long Time Member
Messages
27,224
I am glad to hear that Green Diamond does it right. I wish SP would do the same.



I stack my four-foot piles on top of one another, and side-by-side.
SP doesn't have that good of reputation but they do allow you to hunt. We don't have that much SP land over near the coast but I've killed a few bucks on some of their smaller tracts, but they were select cuts with no planting. I think they burned up last year and I'm anxious to see what it looks like, even though SP has shut their land off for hunting this year.
 

bullskin

Very Active Member
Messages
1,044
SP doesn't have that good of reputation but they do allow you to hunt. We don't have that much SP land over near the coast but I've killed a few bucks on some of their smaller tracts, but they were select cuts with no planting. I think they burned up last year and I'm anxious to see what it looks like, even though SP has shut their land off for hunting this year.


It's tricky. So long as large landowners allow access to their lands, it is difficult to complain about their practices. On the other hand, there won't be much left to hunt--even in the areas onto which deer used to migrate from these lands--if we continue down this road. I would rather see Fish and Game do their job than pit hunters against SP, etc.
 

Buck300

Member
Messages
58
Here is some positive news. Got this in my Dirt Bike club email today. The NFS works very well with us so I trust this info.

Im not 100% sure if that is all the NFS systems but it does hold true for Tahoe National Forest.

Truckee Dirt Riders,

Happy to report that our forest service contact, Johnny Brokaw has indicated that the forest will open 9/15/21 with some conditions such as no dispersed camping and continued fire restrictions.

I think we are all looking forward to getting back out there and continuing our trail work projects and riding!
 

Snoopdogg

Very Active Member
Messages
1,821
Forest Service Ending Regional Closure Order Two Days Early; Five Forests to Remain Closed Under Local Orders

September 14, 2021-- The USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region will end the regional closure order affecting National Forests in California at 11:59 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 15, two days prior to the original end date of Sept. 17. However, forest-wide closures will remain in place and be extended until midnight on September 22nd on the Los Padres, Angeles, San Bernardino, and Cleveland National Forests in Southern California due to local weather and fire factors, as well as a temporary strain on firefighting resources supporting large fires in other areas of the state.

In addition to the four National Forests that will remain closed in Southern California, some National Forest System lands throughout the state will be closed under local closure orders in areas of ongoing wildfires to ensure public safety. This includes the Eldorado National Forest in Northern California, which has a forest closure order until Sept. 30. Fire restrictions also remain in place across all National Forests in California to prevent new fire starts. Please refer to the local National Forest that you plan to visit to obtain specific information on closures and restrictions.

“We are constantly evaluating weather and fire conditions in California, as well as regional and national firefighting resources available to us so that we can ensure the safety of the public and our firefighters,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien. “Some factors are more favorable now, which is why I decided to end the regional closure order. I want to thank the public and our partners for their patience and understanding during these challenging times.”

Factors leading to this decision include:

1. Anticipated increase of firefighting resource availability to California due to fire danger lessening in other areas of the country.

2. Regional weather systems and related climate zones becoming more variable as the seasons change, leading to less uniform conditions across California. Where weather and fire danger remain high, tailored fire restrictions and closures remain in place locally and may be added where necessary.

3. Peak summer visitation has tapered off significantly since the Labor Day holiday weekend. The public is a critical partner in mitigating risk and recreating responsibly on our National Forests.

4. We recognize the important role of National Forests to peoples’ livelihood and quality of life.

Favorable fire conditions remain throughout many parts of the state, and the public’s role in recreating responsibly has never been more important. We remind visitors to practice self-sufficiency during visits to National Forests, be aware of fire conditions in the area you are visiting and follow guidelines to prevent human-caused fire starts. Best practices include:

• Heed local information regarding trails and campgrounds, especially fire restrictions

and closures. Generally, camp stoves with a shutoff valve will be allowed.

• Be proactive in your thinking about preventing fire starts. Smoking, parking in grass, flammable material, and other activities could cause fire ignition under dry conditions.

• COVID-19 remains a concern. Maintain at least six feet distance from others.

• Do not gather in groups and please follow the latest guidance from officials.

• Communicate with others as you pass. Alert trail users of your presence and step

aside to let others pass.

• Pack out your trash and leave with everything you bring in and use.

• All services may not be available, so please plan accordingly.

More than 7,404 wildfires have burned over 2.25 million acres across all jurisdictions in California. The nation remains at Preparedness Level 5 (PL5); the Northern California Geographic Area is at PL5, and the Southern California Geographic Area has moved up to PL4.

The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest is largely in California but is in the Intermountain Region (R4) and is not impacted by the previous closure order.

The Forest Service thanks our partners and the public for their cooperation and understanding. Citizens with specific questions within their area should consult their local forest website or social media pages for more information.

 

PacificFork

Member
Messages
51
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DeerHunter53

Very Active Member
Messages
2,361
I just realized that the point made about Federal management might also be directed toward my comment. And, yes, I do understand that the Feds manage their lands. But timber harvest plans also require coordination with state game departments, which gives hunters an "in" when it comes to management. As it turns out, the Feds are the slowest to rehab our lands--in fact, much of it simply returns to brush. Over the short term, I have found the hunting to be much better on these lands than on most of the privately managed timber lands which are treated almost immediately to remove brush.

The Dixie fire presents sportsmen the opportunity to establish a million acre deer smorgasbord. I swear to God, when I retire I am going to make it my remaining life's work to collect boxes of acorns every fall and then take a slingshot along on all of my scouting trips, launching future oak trees into all of the places from which they have been removed. I shall atone for the decades of turkey dinners and venison I have consumed. Until then, I can contact the DFG, USFS and my Congressman to tell them what works for hunters. We all should.
Johnny Appleseed I'm with you get me the acorns and I will help out
 

DeerHunter53

Very Active Member
Messages
2,361
Yahoo I am up scouting this weekend looking for a big one and a great camping spot. Taking the whole hunt off all 16 days of it and not shooting until I see one that takes 17 years to draw.......
 

Buck300

Member
Messages
58
Apparently no back country camping unless within 300 ft of the PCT. Also you're supposedly only allowed to camp at certain established camp grounds. No random back roads camping Is the way I'm reading the info.
But I suppose if you're a ways back in there it might be hard for them to find you if you're on foot and solo.
 

amadorhunter

Member
Messages
34
SPI has never allowed any sort of camping on, or along there access roads for as long as I have been hunting there properties close to my area, 25 plus years. And, yes they normally have staff watching over there land during hunting season. As of the time I typed this, "ALL" SPI land is still currently closed to public assess due to current weather, and dry conditions. This wont change until we see some significant weather "RAIN". Normally in the past about 3-5 days after a good storm passes through they open up access. Trust me, you don't wont to get caught on there land while they have it closed off. SPI do not have a sense of humor about that!
 

RookieWYhntr

Active Member
Messages
318
SPI has never allowed any sort of camping on, or along there access roads for as long as I have been hunting there properties close to my area, 25 plus years. And, yes they normally have staff watching over there land during hunting season. As of the time I typed this, "ALL" SPI land is still currently closed to public assess due to current weather, and dry conditions. This wont change until we see some significant weather "RAIN". Normally in the past about 3-5 days after a good storm passes through they open up access. Trust me, you don't wont to get caught on there land while they have it closed off. SPI do not have a sense of humor about that!
Just one more question. You don't work for them, do you?
 

amadorhunter

Member
Messages
34
RookieWYhntr.

No, don't work for SPI. I have hunted SPI land in Northern California for many years. Have had a few conversations with the patrol officers in the past, mostly on opening weekends of rifle season. But, have also run into them during the week deep in there properties. A lot of the patrol staff like to drive the roads, and hunt while they are keeping an eye on things! You can check the status if there lands are open or not by going to the SPI website. Or, if you are me and you live close to some of there properties, you can drive right up and see the signs they post on drier years stating they have access closed at this time.
 

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