English Sporting Muzzleloader Shotgun

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
This fall I finished this 12 gauge shotgun. What a blast to load and shoot. The Grandsons are quite good at shooting clays. Different sound than the modern shotguns and the spotter has to tell you whether you hit the clays.

English sportingsotgun1.jpg
 

Bluehair

Long Time Member
Messages
6,650
Beautiful….I would love to walk in a trap club with that thing. Well done.

Any any gun that takes a crew of 2 is badass.
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Thanks. It is a blast and the best part of all is you don't need to clean between shots. At least 25 plus anyway
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
6,248
I think we need to haul it over to the Trap Club and trying it on the trap. Our last try was a……….. classic senior moment.

Looking forward to trying out the one you’re building now.
 

MrShane

Active Member
Messages
117
I have a single bbl. 12 guage muzzy I need to sell.
Custom made in the mid/late 80’s for my Dad somewhere in Texas.
Anyone interested?

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cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Side Hammers don't shoot BH very well unless you have a hotshot nipple or what ever they call them. The real stuff is best for them. BH if for the dudes. Your not a gin-u-one' muzzlestuffer with these modern gunns and scopes is' for sissies.(n)(n):)

Why the heck can't Utah see the light. They need to have a training camp in New Mexico.
 

MrShane

Active Member
Messages
117
Side Hammers don't shoot BH very well unless you have a hotshot nipple or what ever they call them. The real stuff is best for them. BH if for the dudes. Your not a gin-u-one' muzzlestuffer with these modern gunns and scopes is' for sissies.(n)(n):)

Why the heck can't Utah see the light. They need to have a training camp in New Mexico.
No worries, never had anything but the real stuff shot out of it.
In fact, gun comes with some partial cans of the real stuff and some loading components.
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
6,248
Hey cannonball, please post up a picture or two of the project you’re working on now. A few before and after progress pictures would be fun to see.
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Lumpy, the site is a little dead and my methods are a little un-orthodox so it may be interesting for a few. Step 1 is to draw file the flats of the barrel and smooth the tapered edge of the parts of the breech plug and tang. Step 2 is to route the smallest part of the barrel. This is a swamped barrel. It is 1 1/8" at the breach and the octagon part of the barrel narrows to 1". Handwork and inletting black are use from here. I scrape it with the special 1" chisel tool as shown in the picture. Mark the barrel with inletting black, scrap the channel of barrel. Set the barrel in place, tap leaving a black mark and repeat, repeat, and repeat. Those procedures go on with all of the inletting of parts. The tang and other parts are put in place, marked with a pencil and the center wood is removed well inside the pencil mark. Some gun builders use a scribe or knife. I do not. I found that tapping and remove the black is better for me. I leave plenty of wood so the inletted metal parts are well below the wood . You can see the removal process on the tang area with the black to be removed. A few hours when I want to work on it gets the job done. clamp the barrel in place and the next step is the ramrod hole.

English parts.jpg


tools.jpg


Inletting tang.jpg


barrel inlet.jpg


20 ga, shotgun.jpg
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
6,248
You are definitely a talented artist. Thanks for sharing the pictures and your process. I can say this much, everything you’ve ever built is an excellent build and a great shooter.
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Thanks, but stop it Lumpy. I don't need the praise:). I an getting older, the winter's long, and I am after something to do. You got me started, so even if you are the only one, watch me progress over the months, as I'll have some more pictures.
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
6,248
Thanks, but stop it Lumpy. I don't need the praise:). I a getting older, the winter's long, and I am after something to do. You got me started, so even if you are the only one, watch me progress over the months, as I'll have some more pictures.
Do it. And, I praise when praise is due. Even for you, you cranky old SOB!
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Step 1 & 2 was inletting the barrel, breech plug and tang. Step 3 is drilling the ramrod hole . Over the years I have found the long ramrod drll bit wanders(usually) so control it. I always drill the ramrod hole with the lock side up. If is going to wander, gravity has a small affect and I want want the hole centered or a little away from the lock area. I use a cordless drill and check with a small hole three times on the inside flat of the barrel to see where I am at. I use a Q-tip plastic staff with a flashlight looking thru the shaft down the hole It tells me which way of wander. I also have an undersize drill bit to correct an unwanted wander. Once you have a smaller pilot hole for the wander, the bigger bit will follow to a point.
ramrod3.jpg
ramrod check1.jpg
ramrod check 2.jpg
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
I just finished inletting the lock. Want to see how to inlet a lock? There are a lot of sites out there who have videos. The things i am showing are peculiar to my way of doing things. As you can see in the photos I like straight lines and a squared blank. You can also see I pencil around the parts, remove the center part of the wood. I then use inletting black to get my exact mark for carving. I mark and use calipers in inletting and shaping the stock. I find it much easier. With this English sporting rifle the lock area side and the other side are not parallel to each other. I sanded the flat area down for my starting point for the bevel of the lock. It took me 2 minutes with a fast speed grinder and 32 grit sanding belt. The front part is 1 5/8" and the back is 1 3/8 apart. Alex Henry and most other English makers did that. I don't know why, but I will follow their lead. I inlet one of the "guts" at a time. Tried putting the whole lock together, using the inletting black for the internal parts thought I would go mad before I got the installed lock to work. I mark and drill in the wood every place there is a screw hole. It gives me a reference point as to depth of inletting the '"guts". The photo of the lock shows the bridal installed. After that part is inletted I move on and add another internal part of the lock.
Now I have the lock installed I know where the sear is. I will place and position(to meet the sear in the right place) the finished trigger assembly(came as rough cast parts) on the surface and draw pencil lines for the bottom of the gun. The trigger also gives me the position for the butt plate 13 3/4" pull.

lock area.jpg


sander.jpg


lock bridal.jpg
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
6,248
Chipp’en away. Sure looks different when you’re done.

Gonna be cold again next week, keep that propane heater fired up for another month!!!
 

cannonball

Very Active Member
Messages
1,172
Don't use propane in the shop. I use baseboard electric and this gun has already cost me an extra $100 for heat bills this month. The kids got me a TV for Christmas for the shop. Never have it on when I am working on the gun. If the TV was going I can't concentrate on what is happening to the Utah Mule Deer herd this winter. Sure wish I had a bathroom.
Remember a year in the late 50's that was like this one. There were carcasses of deer all over the foothills by the time the winter was over. Difference was there were many times more deer then, and the herd rebounded in just a couple of years. It was open season on cougars and bear during those years. I think all predators should have to draw for a permit to take a deer.
 

MrShane

Active Member
Messages
117
Don't use propane in the shop. I use baseboard electric and this gun has already cost me an extra $100 for heat bills this month. The kids got me a TV for Christmas for the shop. Never have it on when I am working on the gun. If the TV was going I can't concentrate on what is happening to the Utah Mule Deer herd this winter. Sure wish I had a bathroom.
Remember a year in the late 50's that was like this one. There were carcasses of deer all over the foothills by the time the winter was over. Difference was there were many times more deer then, and the herd rebounded in just a couple of years. It was open season on cougars and bear during those years. I think all predators should have to draw for a permit to take a deer.
Should be able to use your Deer tag on a Bear or Cat if you choose to.
 

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