Falsely obtaining Wyoming hunting licenses.

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HikeHunt61

Active Member
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185
Gee, my parents live in Pinedale, and I've spent untold thousands on NR licenses over the past 35 years. Dummy me.... not. I'm glad they got him!
 

ORIONTHEHUNTER

Active Member
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874
Why does that matter? He wasn't a resident, didn't meet any of the requirements of being a resident and was convicted in court after he plead guilty. Quit trying to defend him.
 

Mbogo

Active Member
Messages
561
What taxes?
Wyoming has no state income tax.
If he drove through and bought something he would have to pay sales tax, like everyone, resident or not.
If he had a P.O. Box address then he probably didn't own any land and therefore didn't pay property tax.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
What taxes?
Wyoming has no state income tax.
If he drove through and bought something he would have to pay sales tax, like everyone, resident or not.
If he had a P.O. Box address then he probably didn't own any land and therefore didn't pay property tax.
Says he was building a cabin there as of 2015? Sounds like he might own property there. So did he pay taxes in Wyoming?
 

Mbogo

Active Member
Messages
561
Property tax payments don't mean **** when it comes to residence. I own property in differnet states and pay property tax in each of them, that doesn't give me the right to choose my residence. Get to your point.
 

ORIONTHEHUNTER

Active Member
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874
He doesn't have a point he is trying to defend a poacher that pled guilty. If he had a case he would have fought it, he lied and admitted to lying. Maybe you should look up the residency requirements for Wyoming and realize your tax question is stupid
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
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6,247
Why does that matter? He wasn't a resident, didn't meet any of the requirements of being a resident and was convicted in court after he plead guilty. Quit trying to defend him.
Just to keep things straight...

Are we discussing two different cases here? The one in the OP was charged on Sept. 16 & hasn't yet been convicted of anything.

"Hunt also paid taxes as a Utah resident, Haley noted. Hunt’s arraignment is scheduled in Sublette County Circuit Court for Oct. 4 at 11 a.m."
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
Orion, you come her and hi-jack a thread, talk crap and can't answer a single question. You're acting like you already busted into the liquor cabinet. Go read the article and if you can't answer the question shutup while the men talk it out.
 

SS!

Long Time Member
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3,826
Orion, you come her and hi-jack a thread, talk crap and can't answer a single question. You're acting like you already busted into the liquor cabinet. Go read the article and if you can't answer the question shutup while the men talk it out.
If you read the original article it clearly says he paid taxes in UT and didn’t reside in WY enough days to qualify as a resident for hunting. So where are you going with this?

I know someone in WY who has lived there his whole life but in 2008 lost his job in WY and now works a rotation in AK for an oilfield company. He’s gone enough he does not qualify for resident hunting licenses in any state.
 

wytex

Active Member
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793
Anyone who owns land in Wyoming pays property taxes but that does not meet the requirements for residency.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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So he does pay taxes in Wyoming.

Does he have a current driver's license in Wyoming?

I wouldn't talk about reading Orion. You never read the article from the get go.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
Messages
185
So he does pay taxes in Wyoming.

Does he have a current driver's license in Wyoming?

I wouldn't talk about reading Orion. You never read the article from the get go.
He fails residency based on the 180 day rule- which is specifically outlined by the Wyo G&F. Any other elements he may "make it" on- taxes, drivers license, PO box, voting record, where he buys his dog food, incarceration time (LOL)- are all worthless without meeting the 180 day rule. Per law § 23-1-107 and WGFC Regulation Chapter 44.
 

wytex

Active Member
Messages
793
Doesn't say, do you know if he has a Wyoming drivers license?
He paid taxes in Utah so that kind of negates part of your argument.
As stated above he lived outside of Wyoming for too long to be a resident for game licenses.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
Doesn't say, do you know if he has a Wyoming drivers license?
He paid taxes in Utah so that kind of negates part of your argument.
As stated above he lived outside of Wyoming for too long to be a resident for game licenses.
Whether he has a license could be important here wytex.

Plus whether he pays taxes in Utah doesn't mean he can't be a resident elsewhere. It doesn't negate anything.

It actually doesn't say he lived out of state for to long. It says they could only track his phone for a combined total of 115 days in Wyoming.


Let's keep talking and eventually I will get to the point that a lot of over zealous people are missing.
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
Messages
185
Whether he has a license could be important here wytex.

Plus whether he pays taxes in Utah doesn't mean he can't be a resident elsewhere. It doesn't negate anything.

It actually doesn't say he lived out of state for to long. It says they could only track his phone for a combined total of 115 days in Wyoming.


Let's keep talking and eventually I will get to the point that a lot of over zealous people are missing.
Quote: "Using cell phone records, Haley determined that he spent 115 days or about one-third of a one-year period year in Wyoming –– or more than 180 days outside Wyoming, thus disqualifying him for residency, it says." So if a judge determines insufficient evidence for being out of state more than 180 days, he would win in court. I kinda doubt it considering the charges tho, unless Wyoming just loves wasting money. We'll see I suppose.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
I'm really surprised none of yall have asked the 2 very important questions that accompany my questions.

Come on fellas. Think big picture.👍
 

JB1975

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531
Tri, it’s easy to see how you get your less than stellar business reviews. You are dense to say the least.
 

Tristate

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Jb1975,

I didn't come on here talking crap to you so why don't you scram if you can't add something interesting.

I deal with the public and I don't pay the internet extortion to be able to "manage" my on line image. If you are "dense" enough to believe free internet gossip over a company that has been in business for 23 years and literally has thousands of satisfied customers I DON'T WANT TO DO BUSINESS WITH YOU ANYWAY. Act like a grown, Christian gentleman, and the odds are well in your favor you will be very satisfied with my work.
 

dwalton

Very Active Member
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1,415
Looks like some have a hard time with the definition of what a Wyoming resident is according to the G&F. A person could have a Wyo driver's license, pay property taxes in Wyoming, and still not meet the requirements for resident hunting and fishing privileges.

Wyoming is very different than other states in regard to this matter.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
Okydoky so I actually looked up the exact definition on the Wyoming fish and game website and it says absolutely nothing about 180 days for both the definition of "resident" and "non-resident".
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
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6,247
Okydoky so I actually looked up the exact definition on the Wyoming fish and game website and it says absolutely nothing about 180 days for both the definition of "resident" and "non-resident".

"Wyoming law sets the rules to qualify for any resident game or fish license, preference point, permit or tag. The law requires that an individual must live in an established, fixed and permanent home (domicile) in Wyoming for no less than one full year before they apply for or purchase a resident license. Once a person has established residency to apply for or buy licenses, in order to keep it, he or she has to live in Wyoming for at least 180 days total during the calendar year.

If a person claims residency in any other state, territory or country for any purpose, he or she can’t have Wyoming residency. For example, a Wyoming resident with a temporary winter home in Arizona would lose Wyoming residency for obtaining hunting, fishing and trapping licenses if they bought an Arizona resident fishing license.

There are some exceptions to the one-year provision for minor dependents and active duty military members. If you have questions about whether you qualify for a resident hunting or fishing license, please call your local game warden or Game and Fish regional office."
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
Messages
185
Okydoky so I actually looked up the exact definition on the Wyoming fish and game website and it says absolutely nothing about 180 days for both the definition of "resident" and "non-resident".
Straight from the Wyo G&F website:

Who is a Resident?​

Resident means: "a United States citizen or legal alien who meets the requirements specified in § 23-1-107 and rules of the Game and Fish Commission."

A person shall lose residency in Wyoming if the person moves to another state, territory or country and makes it his or her domicile, or if the person temporarily resides in any other state, territory, or country for an aggregate of one hundred eighty (180) days or more in a calendar year
 

Homer

Long Time Member
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10,411
Okydoky so I actually looked up the exact definition on the Wyoming fish and game website and it says absolutely nothing about 180 days for both the definition of "resident" and "non-resident".
keep reading......

Can I apply for a Resident License?​

To qualify for any resident game and fish license, preference point, permit or tag, a person shall be domiciled and shall physically reside in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 consecutive days) immediately preceding the date the person applies for or purchases the license, preference point, permit or tag and the person shall not have claimed residency elsewhere for any other purpose (including, but not limited to, voting, payment of income taxes, purchase of resident hunting, fishing or trapping licenses, etc.) during that one (1) year period.

Any active duty member of the armed forces of the United States who has been stationed in Wyoming for ninety (90) days shall qualify for resident licenses so long as the member remains stationed in Wyoming.

Who is a Resident?​

Resident means: "a United States citizen or legal alien who meets the requirements specified in § 23-1-107 and rules of the Game and Fish Commission."

A person shall lose residency in Wyoming if the person moves to another state, territory or country and makes it his or her domicile, or if the person temporarily resides in any other state, territory, or country for an aggregate of one hundred eighty (180) days or more in a calendar year, unless he or she qualifies as one of the following:

• A minor dependent
• Is temporarily employed in the service of the United States
• Is a patient at a hospital or institution
• Is attending school
• Is an active duty member of the armed forces
• Is serving full time in an established volunteer service

(Refer to § 23-1-107 and WGFC Regulation Chapter 44 for detailed requirements).

What is Domicile?​

 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
Messages
6,247
And some more...

"A guide to meeting the requirements of residency for hunting, fishing, trapping licenses and preference points in Wyoming.

Hunting and fishing in Wyoming is a privilege granted by state law. The Wyoming Legislature has established the residency requirements and fees for hunting and fishing licenses. Wyoming, like all other states, has different fees for residents and nonresidents. Wyoming statutes and Game and Fish Commission regulations have been enacted to ensure that only bona fide Wyoming residents are issued resident hunting, fishing, trapping licenses, and preference points. It is the person's responsibility to determine his or her individual residency status prior to applying for or purchasing a resident license. It is not the license agent's responsibility to determine or verify residency status. If in doubt about your residency status, please contact your local Wyoming Game and Fish Department enforcement personnel.

It should be noted that the definition of residency for the purpose of purchasing resident hunting, fishing, trapping licenses, and preference points is vastly different than for other purposes such as driver's license, voter registration, vehicle registration, college tuition, jury duty, tax purposes and/or professional and business licenses. Residency requirements may also be different than the state in which you have/had residency.

To qualify for any resident game and fish license, preference point, permit or tag, a person shall be domiciled and shall physically reside in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 consecutive days) immediately preceding the date the person applies for or purchases the license, preference point, permit or tag and the person shall not have claimed residency elsewhere for any other purpose (including, but not limited to, voting, payment of income taxes, purchase of resident hunting, fishing or trapping licenses, etc.) during that one (1) year period.​


Any active duty member of the armed forces of the United States who has been stationed in Wyoming for ninety (90) days shall qualify for resident licenses so long as the member remains stationed in Wyoming.

Who is a Resident?​

Resident means: "a United States citizen or legal alien who meets the requirements specified in § 23-1-107 and rules of the Game and Fish Commission."

A person shall lose residency in Wyoming if the person moves to another state, territory or country and makes it his or her domicile, or if the person temporarily resides in any other state, territory, or country for an aggregate of one hundred eighty (180) days or more in a calendar year, unless he or she qualifies as one of the following:

• A minor dependent
• Is temporarily employed in the service of the United States
• Is a patient at a hospital or institution
• Is attending school
• Is an active duty member of the armed forces
• Is serving full time in an established volunteer service

(Refer to § 23-1-107 and WGFC Regulation Chapter 44 for detailed requirements).

What is Domicile?​

Domicile means: "That place where a person has his true, fixed and permanent home to which, whenever a person is temporarily absent, the person has the intention of returning."

Having a mailing address, owning property or a business, or being employed in Wyoming shall not alone prove Wyoming residency or domicile.

Domicile is established when the person demonstrates that he or she:

• Physically resides in Wyoming
• Has abandoned domicile in other states
• Has made his or her permanent residence in Wyoming
• Is not residing in Wyoming for a special or temporary purpose

Military Personnel​

A Wyoming resident serving active military duty in another state, territory or country, including spouse and minor dependents, may maintain resident status for the purpose of purchasing resident hunting, fishing, trapping licenses, and preference points if the person:


• Is not a civilian employee of the military;

• Makes no claim of residency elsewhere for any other purpose (such as, but not limited to, voting, payment of state income taxes, purchase of resident hunting or fishing licenses, etc.)

• Was a resident of Wyoming when he or she entered the military and Wyoming remains his or her declared Home of Record or the person;
Makes no current claim of residency in any other state, territory or country for any purpose;
Has established his/her home of record in Wyoming;
Has maintained his/her voter registration in Wyoming.The spouse and minor dependents of an active duty military member qualifying as a resident shall qualify as residents for the same periods unless they have made a claim of residency in any other state, territory or country for any purposes during those periods.

What is Home of Record?​

Home of Record means: The place recorded, on military form DD 214, as the home of the individual at the time they enlisted, were commissioned, or initially ordered to active duty in the military.

Students​

Wyoming residents who attend an institution of higher education outside of Wyoming may maintain residency for purchasing resident hunting, fishing, trapping licenses, and preference points as long as they meet all of the following requirements:

• The person must pay nonresident or non-differential tuition fees;
• The person does not claim residency elsewhere for any other purpose (such as, but not limited to, voting, payment of state income taxes, purchase of resident hunting or fishing licenses, etc.).

A nonresident person who attends school in Wyoming may establish residency if:

• The person is domiciled in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 days) immediately preceding the date of making application for or purchasing a license; and
• The person makes no claim of residency elsewhere for any other purpose during that one (1) year period.

Minor Dependents​

A minor is considered a person under 18 years of age.

A minor dependent shall qualify as a resident if either the custodial or the non-custodial parent qualifies as a resident and the minor is or will be residing in Wyoming during any portion of the year. For additional information, see § 23-1-107(b).

For example, a minor who lives outside Wyoming with his or her custodial parent during the school year can purchase a Wyoming resident fishing license if his or her non-custodial parent qualifies as a resident and the minor will be residing in Wyoming for any portion of the year.

Special Situations​

Temporary Absences: Being "absent from Wyoming for a special or temporary purpose" includes those situations where a person leaves the state for a short, definite period of time and has a clear expectation and intention of returning.

A person may leave the state for a temporary period of time due to retirement plans(1), job requirements(2), charitable, humanitarian and/or religious purposes (3) and not lose residency status provided that:

• Wyoming residency was first established by being domiciled in Wyoming for one (1) full year prior to the absence;

• The person's domicile or established, fixed, and permanent home consists of real property situated in Wyoming;

• The person makes no claim for residency in any other state, territory, or country; and

• The person does not reside in any other state, territory, or country for more than an aggregate of 180 days in a calendar year.

(1) Retirees/Snowbirds: A person who qualifies as a resident and whose domicile is in Wyoming does not lose residency status if he or she leaves the state as a part of retirement plans, provided that his or her permanent domicile and residence (real property) remains in Wyoming and they are not gone for more than an aggregate of 180 days in a calendar year. The person who leaves Wyoming upon retirement, establishes his or her domicile elsewhere, and returns to Wyoming periodically for recreational purposes loses residency even though he or she may own property in Wyoming. Persons moving to Wyoming to retire must be domiciled in Wyoming for one year to establish residency (see "Domicile" definition).

(2) Working Outside of Wyoming Temporarily: A person who is sent out of state to work for a short period of time, knowing that as soon as the project is completed, the person will return to Wyoming to his or her domicile, shall not lose residency status. However, a person who leaves the state to take employment loses residency even though he or she may desire to return to Wyoming at some future date.

(3) Charitable, Humanitarian or Religious Purposes: A person who is serving full time in a qualifying program, for a period not to exceed 4 years (as long as the services are provided without remuneration), shall not lose residency status. However, a signed and notarized letter from the volunteer service program director, which describes the services provided, the duration of service and the hours served, must be submitted to establish compliance with § 23-1-107(c) and WGFC Regulation Chapter 44.

Con't..​

 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
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6,247

con't...​

What Documentation Do I Need?​

A person shall provide proof of residency when making application for, receiving or purchasing a resident license or preference point. License selling agents and the Game & Fish Department will accept as documentation:

• A current Wyoming driver’s license or identification card, or a copy thereof;

• A copy of the applicant’s school records;

• A current military form DD214 or a “Proof of Service Letter” reflecting the applicant’s Home of Record and most recent Leave & Earning Statement (See MILITARY PERSONNEL-HOME OF RECORD);

• A proof of residency statement on a form provided by the Department that has been completed and signed by the applicant. Any active duty member of the armed forces, a spouse or minor child, when making application for a resident license, preference point, permit or tag, shall be required to complete and submit the proof of residency statement; or

• A minor dependent may use, as proof of residency, the documentary evidence of his or her parent or legal guardian. (See MINOR DEPENDENTS).

The above listed documentary evidence furnished by an applicant for a resident license shall not be considered conclusive proof in a court of law that the applicant is a resident in accordance with Wyoming statutes. "
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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Screenshot_20211001-164326_Drive.jpg
Screenshot_20211001-164726_Drive.jpg



This is also from the fish and game website. So it looks like if you are internet challenged and take the wrong turn at Albuquerque you face a 21 year prison sentence. Sounds reasonable.

Screenshot_20211001-164326_Drive.jpg
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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6,721
I would bet $5 that he also had a Utah hunting of fishing license in most of those years.....
That's what I was waiting for Homer. Finally someone starts thinking around here. Now was it a Utah resident license and why wouldn't they say that in the article?
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
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6,247
This is also from the fish and game website. So it looks like if you are internet challenged and take the wrong turn at Albuquerque you face a 21 year prison sentence. Sounds reasonable.
Nah. Although someone such as Stevie Wonder might have some difficulty, most 8-yr olds can google "requirement for wyoming resident hunting license" & quickly see what it takes. The first thing that popped on my page was this paragraph & the link for more.

"To qualify for any resident game and fish license, preference point, permit or tag, a person shall be domiciled and shall physically reside in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 consecutive days) immediately preceding the date the person applies for or purchases the license, preference point, permit or tag and the ..."
 

JPickett

Active Member
Messages
821
I know someone in WY who has lived there his whole life but in 2008 lost his job in WY and now works a rotation in AK for an oilfield company. He’s gone enough he does not qualify for resident hunting licenses in any state.
You’d think there could be some legal way around that with the game department. That’s a pretty crappy deal if a guy has to do what he has to do for a living and can’t be a resident hunter in his own states eyes
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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Nah. Although someone such as Stevie Wonder might have some difficulty, most 8-yr olds can google "requirement for wyoming resident hunting license" & quickly see what it takes. The first thing that popped on my page was this paragraph & the link for more.

"To qualify for any resident game and fish license, preference point, permit or tag, a person shall be domiciled and shall physically reside in Wyoming for one (1) full year (365 consecutive days) immediately preceding the date the person applies for or purchases the license, preference point, permit or tag and the ..."
I Googled Wyoming fish and game and went straight to hunting and straight to licenses and that's where it sent me. I think any eight year old could do that also and they sure wouldn't see anything about a 180 day rule just like your last post smartass.
 

OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
Messages
6,247
I Googled Wyoming fish and game and went straight to hunting and straight to licenses and that's where it sent me. I think any eight year old could do that also and they sure wouldn't see anything about a 180 day rule just like your last post smartass.

Additional information on applying for licenses​

 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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I believe that some people find that on the website. I also know you can go to the website, look up their exact definition of resident and non-resident on their website and never see a single sentence about 180 days. I already proved that.

I never was arguing that the rule of 180 days doesn't exist. I was showing how their own website will lead a person who wants to obey the law to an incorrect conclusion which leaves him under threat of 21 years in prison.
 
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Utah400Elk

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The guy paid income tax in Utah. He lived and worked in Utah and traveled to WY. It’s cut and dry and will not be a hard case to prove. This actually happens a lot in WY. Game and fish is aggressive about false residency claims. Anybody who tries to argue ambiguity in the residency is waisting their time. I suspect he knew exactly what he was doing.

I have land in Utah, lived there for over 20 years, have two Utah DLs, retirement accounts in UT, and will receive a pension from the state…all that said, I am not a Utah resident which significantly affects by hunting drawing odds.
 

JPickett

Active Member
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821
I bet it’s real easy to walk into a fish and game office in any state and find out if you meet the resident requirements for buying a license. In fact if you are indeed a resident I’d bet it’s down right convenient to do so. I know I’ve been in my local office several times picking stuff up. Shouldn’t be a real big mystery to anyone not trying to lie
 

Tristate

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I bet it’s real easy to walk into a fish and game office in any state and find out if you meet the resident requirements for buying a license. In fact if you are indeed a resident I’d bet it’s down right convenient to do so. I know I’ve been in my local office several times picking stuff up. Shouldn’t be a real big mystery to anyone not trying to lie
I bet you're right. However why would you? I've never once wondered if I am a resident in Texas and whether I qualify to buy a license here. I just took for granted that since I own property here, pay taxes here, vote here, and have a DL here I am a resident. I never thought I might not be able to buy a resident license here because of some cheesy technicality of how many days I spent the night in Texas in a given year.

Sounds like your money and labor is good enough for Wyoming but you ain't good enough for Wyoming.
 

Homer

Long Time Member
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10,411
I doubt the dead deer photo is part of the case.....but note the fine shooting......
65A5498E-119F-4B37-906A-3E1516038C26.png
 

Mbogo

Active Member
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561
The leg and the antler base. I guess somebody got shook up.😂
Why are you assuming the hunter did that?
Did you see him shoot the antler?
Did the deer say his antler got shot?
How do you know he didn't have a hard night drinking and on the way back to his aspen patch tripped over a log and drilled his antlers on a lava rock?
Not knowing exactly what happened and partially stunned, he could've wandered around and broke his leg in a badger hole?
You and your crazy assumptions.
 

tracker12

Very Active Member
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1,259
As I see it his problem was buying a license in the first place. Should have just went hunting. The chance of getting caught with the amount of Wildlife officers WY employees has to be like .01%.

I say this with jest but in all the days I hunted this state I have never seen a Fish and game vehicle let alone have someone check me. I fished the North Platte last week and thought for sure I would see someone in that area.
 

Tristate

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Mbogo, I could be making incorrect assumptions but I'm sure having fun looking at the pic. At least I'll tell you when I'm only guessing.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
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As I see it his problem was buying a license in the first place. Should have just went hunting. The chance of getting caught with the amount of Wildlife officers WY employees has to be like .01%.

I say this with jest but in all the days I hunted this state I have never seen a Fish and game vehicle let alone have someone check me. I fished the North Platte last week and thought for sure I would see someone in that area.
That's kind of along the lines of one of my points. Right now on these same forums there is a thread about a valley full of dead headless bucks in Wyoming. This is a real problem.

Instead game and fish is tracking people's cell phones and counting how many days your phone is outside of the state.

Did anybody notice this guy isn't charged with actually killing something?
 

Utahlefty

Active Member
Messages
176
As I see it his problem was buying a license in the first place. Should have just went hunting. The chance of getting caught with the amount of Wildlife officers WY employees has to be like .01%.

I say this with jest but in all the days I hunted this state I have never seen a Fish and game vehicle let alone have someone check me. I fished the North Platte last week and thought for sure I would see someone in that area.
My family has hunted in WY for 22 years, maybe 80 tags in total.

I can recall exactly ONE year we weren't checked by a warden. One. For the two unit 55 elk tags I've had, we were "casually" checked daily at the trailhead.

I've been checked more in WY than all other states combined, maybe by a factor of 2-3.

I can totally see them doing this (the OP). AK may be the only state with more enthusiastic GWs than WY, IME. ;)
 
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JPickett

Active Member
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821
I bet you're right. However why would you? I've never once wondered if I am a resident in Texas and whether I qualify to buy a license here. I just took for granted that since I own property here, pay taxes here, vote here, and have a DL here I am a resident. I never thought I might not be able to buy a resident license here because of some cheesy technicality of how many days I spent the night in Texas in a given year.

Sounds like your money and labor is good enough for Wyoming but you ain't good enough for Wyoming.
Kinda what I was getting at. If your indeed a resident it shouldn’t be much of a question
 

WapitiBob

Long Time Member
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5,017
I believe that some people find that on the website. I also know you can go to the website, look up their exact definition of resident and non-resident on their website and never see a single sentence about 180 days. I already proved that.

I never was arguing that the rule of 180 days doesn't exist. I was showing how their own website will lead a person who wants to obey the law to an incorrect conclusion which leaves him under threat of 21 years in prison.

What you proved is a lack of understanding when reading game and fish regulations, a problem many have. Had you looked at WS 23-1-107, which is referenced in the regulation, you would have seen the 180 day notation.

“Resident” means a United States citizen or legal alien who is domiciled in Wyoming for at least one (1) full year immediately preceding making application for any resident game and fish license, preference point, permit or tag, shall not have claimed residency in any other state, territory, or country for any other purpose during that one (1) year period, and meets the requirements specified in W.S. § 23-1-102, § 23-1-107 and § 23-2-101 (a)."
 
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Tristate

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Pardon me Bob for not knowing how to look up legal code. I mean every single sportsman should have a law degree or it will cost them 21 years of their life.

Thanks though for backing me up with outdoorwriter though. Seems you were able to find the part of the website also that doesn't mention a 180 day rule.
 

OutdoorWriter

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I believe that some people find that on the website. I also know you can go to the website, look up their exact definition of resident and non-resident on their website and never see a single sentence about 180 days. I already proved that.

I never was arguing that the rule of 180 days doesn't exist. I was showing how their own website will lead a person who wants to obey the law to an incorrect conclusion which leaves him under threat of 21 years in prison.
Dear Stevie,

On the same page of the Am I a Wyoming Resident? link:

Special Situations

Temporary Absences: Being "absent from Wyoming for a special or temporary purpose" includes those situations where a person leaves the state for a short, definite period of time and has a clear expectation and intention of returning.

A person may leave the state for a temporary period of time due to retirement plans(1), job requirements(2), charitable, humanitarian and/or religious purposes (3) and not lose residency status provided that:

• Wyoming residency was first established by being domiciled in Wyoming for one (1) full year prior to the absence;

• The person's domicile or established, fixed, and permanent home consists of real property situated in Wyoming;

• The person makes no claim for residency in any other state, territory, or country; and

• The person does not reside in any other state, territory, or country for more than an aggregate of 180 days in a calendar year.

(1) Retirees/Snowbirds: A person who qualifies as a resident and whose domicile is in Wyoming does not lose residency status if he or she leaves the state as a part of retirement plans, provided that his or her permanent domicile and residence (real property) remains in Wyoming and they are not gone for more than an aggregate of 180 days in a calendar year. The person who leaves Wyoming upon retirement, establishes his or her domicile elsewhere, and returns to Wyoming periodically for recreational purposes loses residency even though he or she may own property in Wyoming. Persons moving to Wyoming to retire must be domiciled in Wyoming for one year to establish residency (see "Domicile" definition).

(2) Working Outside of Wyoming Temporarily: A person who is sent out of state to work for a short period of time, knowing that as soon as the project is completed, the person will return to Wyoming to his or her domicile, shall not lose residency status. However, a person who leaves the state to take employment loses residency even though he or she may desire to return to Wyoming at some future date.

(3) Charitable, Humanitarian or Religious Purposes: A person who is serving full time in a qualifying program, for a period not to exceed 4 years (as long as the services are provided without remuneration), shall not lose residency status. However, a signed and notarized letter from the volunteer service program director, which describes the services provided, the duration of service and the hours served, must be submitted to establish compliance with § 23-1-107(c) and WGFC Regulation Chapter 44.
What Documentation Do I Need?

A person shall provide proof of residency when making application for, receiving or purchasing a resident license or preference point. License selling agents and the Game & Fish Department will accept as documentation:

• A current Wyoming driver’s license or identification card, or a copy thereof;

• A copy of the applicant’s school records;

• A current military form DD214 or a “Proof of Service Letter” reflecting the applicant’s Home of Record and most recent Leave & Earning Statement (See MILITARY PERSONNEL-HOME OF RECORD);

• A proof of residency statement on a form provided by the Department that has been completed and signed by the applicant. Any active duty member of the armed forces, a spouse or minor child, when making application for a resident license, preference point, permit or tag, shall be required to complete and submit the proof of residency statement; or

• A minor dependent may use, as proof of residency, the documentary evidence of his or her parent or legal guardian. (See MINOR DEPENDENTS).

The above listed documentary evidence furnished by an applicant for a resident license shall not be considered conclusive proof in a court of law that the applicant is a resident in accordance with Wyoming statutes.
 

MilliGun

Active Member
Messages
158
Pardon me Bob for not knowing how to look up legal code. I mean every single sportsman should have a law degree or it will cost them 21 years of their life.

Thanks though for backing me up with outdoorwriter though. Seems you were able to find the part of the website also that doesn't mention a 180 day rule.
If I understand this correctly he found a “gray area” in the system?

Just like WLHOnX2.0

How would it be to always find the gray area?

Tri if you spend less time on here and flesh out the animals I dropped off to you I could get you paid. Back to work!
 
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Reactions: DW

joesikora

Very Active Member
Messages
2,481
Why does that matter? He wasn't a resident, didn't meet any of the requirements of being a resident and was convicted in court after he plead guilty. Quit trying to defend him.
Orin, what I think Tri is saying is that if he was paying taxes in WY and made a WY DL it wouldnt be illegal. He could have been working out of state for multiple years and if his home address is his parents address where he grew up at and was paying his fair share of taxes he’s not illegal. But if that was the case Im sure his lawyer would have thought of it
Why does that matter? He wasn't a resident, didn't meet any of the requirements of being a resident and was convicted in court after he plead guilty. Quit trying to defend him.
 

WapitiBob

Long Time Member
Messages
5,017
Pardon me Bob for not knowing how to look up legal code. I mean every single sportsman should have a law degree or it will cost them 21 years of their life.

Thanks though for backing me up with outdoorwriter though. Seems you were able to find the part of the website also that doesn't mention a 180 day rule.



Your posted definition includes the following: "and meets the requirements specified in W.S. § 23-1-102, § 23-1-107 and § 23-2-101 (a)"

Anybody reading that and not using Google to look up ws 23-1-102, 107, and 2-101 deserves a ticket.
 

BuzzH

Long Time Member
Messages
4,065
That's my point Bob. We ain't talking about a ticket. We are talking about 21 years in prison.
We value our wildlife in Wyoming...I hope he gets the max.

Unfortunately, like in nearly 100% of any law violation in the United States, it will be plea bargained down to some bullchit deal. Slap on the wrist and a fine, oh, and don't forget the license revocation for a guy that never let illegally obtaining a hunting license slow him down in the first place.

He knew what he was doing the whole time and knew it was illegal.
 

Tristate

Long Time Member
Messages
6,721
He knew what he was doing the whole time and knew it was illegal.
One more bit of gossip neither you or I know.

Good to hear you think a guy spending a large percentage of his life in prison is the equivalent of semantics on a government application. 🤪

Maybe one day you will check the wrong box for race on an application and spend some time in prison to rethink what eye for an eye really means .
 
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