Fixed Blade & Mechanical terminal reports?

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
Setting up some arrows with both fixed blades and mechanicals for some archery elk hunts I have coming up. I think I’ll keep both in my quiver. For different scenarios.

But I was curious who’s killed with both and what you think of how each performs. I’ve only killed a cow elk with a bow. It was perfectly broadside at 30 yards with a SEVR 2.0. A 570gr. arrow 250fps. The arrow snapped off inside her, but did make an exit hole. She only went about 50 yards.

My setup for this year will be a 525gr. arrow at 285fps. Shooting the SEVR. 2.0 and the 1” Tooth of the Arrow fixed blade.

Has anyone taken a frontal with a 2” expandable?

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Elkslayer

Active Member
Messages
286
I watched a 125gr Rocket Steelhead mechanical go through a mature bull at 78 yards. It was quartering hard toward us and the hunter put it right behind the left shoulder crease. The arrow traveled through the body and the broadhead was sticking out the other side. Bull went 30 yards and tipped over.
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
Friends don't let friend's shoot elk with mechanicals.
Hahaha thank you Justin. They just shoot so damn good! But I think having a fixed blade nocked for any potential close encounter is the smarter move.
I watched a 125gr Rocket Steelhead mechanical go through a mature bull at 78 yards. It was quartering hard toward us and the hunter put it right behind the left shoulder crease. The arrow traveled through the body and the broadhead was sticking out the other side. Bull went 30 yards and tipped over.
Thank you for the report!! This would likely be the scenario I would use one in. Potentially longer shot, more controlled situation, with an unaware animal.
 

PRCnut

Active Member
Messages
289
Have shot both and prefer a fixed blade . Try kudupoints and you’ll never look back. Shoot just like your field points out to 100 yds. ( of course your bow needs to be properly tuned ). Last bull I shot was a complete pass through at 86 yds!

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goforbroke

Active Member
Messages
437
I am a big fan of mechanical, I have better success than fixed blade. Why - I tend to hit where I aim more often. I find mechanical are much less likely to deflect of course if they hit brush etc.

I used rocket steelhead for years and now I use sevr. Get broadhead. I like that it can swivel a bit and stays locked open so it doesn't fall out as easy as the steel head. I prefer the 1.5" for elk and 2" for antelope and deer.

I like your arrow weight, I shoot 425 for deer and 575 for elk, but those 575 are dropping fast at 70 yards(my max for elk) I will do 525 the next time I am setting up an elk arrow.
 

Bookhead

Very Active Member
Messages
1,191
I don't know why anyone would shoot a mechanical its just being lazy. You can get several different brands of fixed blades to shoot just like a field tip and don't have to wonder if it's gonna fail on any shot. Mechanicals shouldn't be legal
 

BackcountryRob

Active Member
Messages
112
Congrats on the Cow Elk! Have not harvested an elk before, but whitetails with both mechanical and fixed (Muzzy, Rage, Iron Will, Sevr, Spitfire, old styles of both). Not a fan of most all mechanicals on the market as the blades break too easy and slight chance of malfunction.

Can't even compare blood trails of fixed vs mechanicals. Yes sometimes fixed leave great ones, but almost every time mechanicals look like dumped paint cans. That means quicker expiration and easier tracking.

Fixed are better for going thru bone and mechanicals if the shot is back. All about shot placement with advantages for each style.

The greater wound channels and durability are what makes SEVR 1.5" my choice. Again, I have never harvested an elk.
 

Grouse Legs

Active Member
Messages
180
I use fixed blade. The shuttle t locks. Sometimes lately they are hard to get, maybe covid supply issues.

I used to use the Randy ulmer signature mechanicals. Those flew great now they don’t make them anymore.

It’s easier to trust a fixed blade to perform in the ultimate moment of truth
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
I ordered some Grim Reaper Micro Hades 4 Blade in 150gr to test out. A little over 2” of cutting diameter and seem to be good heads. I have plenty of time for testing and tuning and I think I’ll settle on a good fixed blade.
 

458win

Member
Messages
39
Will mechanicals work on elk? Absolutely. However, never read of anyone that says “if I only had a mechanical I would of killed that bull instead of this fixed blade” … you do see mechanicals fail and they wish they had a solid fixed blade though.

It all goes back to shot placement, make a great shot and it doesn’t matter what you have on the end of the arrow as long as it’s sharp. Bad shot, it doesn’t matter if you have the best fixed blade on the market still going to be a tough recovery.

The only elk I’ve killed with a mechanical was a cow and a 1 3/8” grim reaper. Worked great but still don’t recommend them. Frontal shots are a very iffy opportunity on elk with any broadhead.
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
Will mechanicals work on elk? Absolutely. However, never read of anyone that says “if I only had a mechanical I would of killed that bull instead of this fixed blade” … you do see mechanicals fail and they wish they had a solid fixed blade though.

It all goes back to shot placement, make a great shot and it doesn’t matter what you have on the end of the arrow as long as it’s sharp. Bad shot, it doesn’t matter if you have the best fixed blade on the market still going to be a tough recovery.

The only elk I’ve killed with a mechanical was a cow and a 1 3/8” grim reaper. Worked great but still don’t recommend them. Frontal shots are a very iffy opportunity on elk with any broadhead.
Thank you for the reply and personal experience!
 

marley

Very Active Member
Messages
2,125
I've been using Grim Reapers for 15 years and doubt I'll ever use anything different. I've killed everything from turkeys to bison with them and never not had one pass completely through other than a Waterbuck in Africa that was a head on shot. The only thing showing on the head on shot were the fletches. Lots of penetration and big holes equals dead animals
 

c3

Very Active Member
Messages
2,008
"I don't know why anyone would shoot mechanicals... they should be illegal"

Hahahahaha, this bull was doing a backflip over logs and a cliff in less than 10 seconds and dead where it landed 33 yards from where I shot. That tree is sprayed 6' above the ground and the blood under the rocks was about 12' up hill from where he landed.

I guess I was just being lazy :)

Cheers, Pete

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Bookhead

Very Active Member
Messages
1,191
"I don't know why anyone would shoot mechanicals... they should be illegal"

Hahahahaha, this bull was doing a backflip over logs and a cliff in less than 10 seconds and dead where it landed 33 yards from where I shot. That tree is sprayed 6' above the ground and the blood under the rocks was about 12' up hill from where he landed.

I guess I was just being lazy :)

Cheers, Pete

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Oh wow! You're the only one that's ever killed an elk with mechanicals 😆. I've killed way more then my fair share with fixed blades and never had a failure I hope you don't either but your odds of that are significantly higher because a fixed blade one piece head can't fail only the shooter can. I've guided and hunted allot of archery animals and I've seen several mechanical heads fail. Use them if you want I hope it doesn't come back to bite you in the a$$ for the animals sake
 

Bookhead

Very Active Member
Messages
1,191
When I first started bowhunting I used mechanicals I killed some stuff with them even my first elk but I had one failure on a deer and that was enough for me and then I saw more failures and now I don't like them at all to each his own I guess. All that being said a field tip in the lungs will kill an elk, any hole will. If I have to shoot through a rib or tough angle I'm not going to gamble with a mechanical head ever
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
"I don't know why anyone would shoot mechanicals... they should be illegal"

Hahahahaha, this bull was doing a backflip over logs and a cliff in less than 10 seconds and dead where it landed 33 yards from where I shot. That tree is sprayed 6' above the ground and the blood under the rocks was about 12' up hill from where he landed.

I guess I was just being lazy :)

Cheers, Pete

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Badass!!

Yeah, I had a smart ass reply about only lazy people using mechanicals, but decided to refrain hahaha. I guess everyone is entitled to their own views and opinions. But I personally don't feel that way at all. Everything I've killed so far has been with mechanicals and my bow is tuned plenty good. I like the big holes, how they fly in the wind, and also how forgiving they are for a torqued shot compared to a fixed blade. But I'm If I can get a 1 1/16" four blade fixed blades to hit with my field points at 80 yards, I think I'll entertain that idea quite a bit!
 

twopointdn

Active Member
Messages
251
I like my Grim Reapers as well. 1 3/8 for elk for me. I have been shooting them since they come out many years ago. My elk tip over within eye sight within 30 yards of the hit this year. I like tracking but it was exciting to see the entire show from start to finish.
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
I like my Grim Reapers as well. 1 3/8 for elk for me. I have been shooting them since they come out many years ago. My elk tip over within eye sight within 30 yards of the hit this year. I like tracking but it was exciting to see the entire show from start to finish.
Good to hear dude. I decided to go with the shorter head, but with 4 blades just for ease of tuning honestly. Bigger blades are better, I just didn’t want to fight it as I know the season is fast approaching!
 

BackcountryRob

Active Member
Messages
112
Will mechanicals work on elk? Absolutely. However, never read of anyone that says “if I only had a mechanical I would of killed that bull instead of this fixed blade” … you do see mechanicals fail and they wish they had a solid fixed blade though.

It all goes back to shot placement, make a great shot and it doesn’t matter what you have on the end of the arrow as long as it’s sharp. Bad shot, it doesn’t matter if you have the best fixed blade on the market still going to be a tough recovery.

The only elk I’ve killed with a mechanical was a cow and a 1 3/8” grim reaper. Worked great but still don’t recommend them. Frontal shots are a very iffy opportunity on elk with any broadhead.
Hit em back in the stomach and my first thought would be, "if only I had a mechanical instead of a fixed"
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
I have shot multiple elk with NAP 100gr Thunderheads and then 3 with the Swhacker 100gr mechs. I loved how accurate the mechs were and the exit wound, but the entrance wound was nothing at all. I killed all animals I shot with the NAPs, I killed only 1 of the animals I shot with the mechs sadly. For elk I don't think mechanicals are the way to go.
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
I love how hunters blame their gear when the main part that fails is the hunter. Make a good shot with either broadhead and the animal will die.
Fake news. Shot all 3 of those cows right behind the shoulder, the blades opened up over half way through the animal. That's gear issue, not shot placement.
 

Ynothunt41

Active Member
Messages
137
How do you know, did you get the animal?

Saw one 4 days later running around that was just fine, after miles and miles of tracking the other and days of not finding any carcus I'm gonna assume that it favored the same.
You have no idea it was the same animal and you have no way to prove you what you are saying is true if you didn't find the animal. I would call that fake news. Do what you think is right. That's why we all make our own choices. Good luck this year.
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
You have no idea it was the same animal and you have no way to prove you what you are saying is true if you didn't find the animal. I would call that fake news. Do what you think is right. That's why we all make our own choices. Good luck this year.
I have every idea it was the same Animal. No one else hunted the area but one guy lol. Don't tell me what I know and don't know fool.
 

WapitiBob

Long Time Member
Messages
5,228
Oh wow! You're the only one that's ever killed an elk with mechanicals 😆. I've killed way more then my fair share with fixed blades and never had a failure I hope you don't either but your odds of that are significantly higher because a fixed blade one piece head can't fail only the shooter can. I've guided and hunted allot of archery animals and I've seen several mechanical heads fail. Use them if you want I hope it doesn't come back to bite you in the a$$ for the animals sake

Obviously you never shot a Satellite fixed head.
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
Opened "over half way thru" yet never recovered the animal.

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Well that's the assumption, cause when I found the arrow it was partially opened. But coulda opened on the ground. And when you see the same little rag horn bull with a distinct eye guard and a blood stain behind the shoulder your arrow exited then it's pretty obvious that's the bull I shot.
 

JakeH

Long Time Member
Messages
3,402
I have shot multiple elk with NAP 100gr Thunderheads and then 3 with the Swhacker 100gr mechs. I loved how accurate the mechs were and the exit wound, but the entrance wound was nothing at all. I killed all animals I shot with the NAPs, I killed only 1 of the animals I shot with the mechs sadly. For elk I don't think mechanicals are the way to go.
Swhakers are not designed to be opened up on the entrance, you picked a poor mechanical to use in my opinion. Most others will be open and cut a large entry hole.

A swhacker will almost never be open on entrance, it's all but impossible with the way they are designed.

That said, I've lost elk with mechanicals and with fixed heads, made some good shots and still lost elk. Made some bad shots and recovered them. Some times it's just luck. And sometimes they just have one hell of a will to live.
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
Swhakers are not designed to be opened up on the entrance, you picked a poor mechanical to use in my opinion. Most others will be open and cut a large entry hole.

A swhacker will almost never be open on entrance, it's all but impossible with the way they are designed.

That said, I've lost elk with mechanicals and with fixed heads, made some good shots and still lost elk. Made some bad shots and recovered them. Some times it's just luck. And sometimes they just have one hell of a will to live.
Yes I know they are meant to open inside the ribs. I'm not so much worried about the entrance hole as I am what it does inside, but they didn't seem to do much on that aspect either.
 

COPLAINSHNTR

Member
Messages
66
So I am most certainly not an expert when it comes to archery or archery equipment. I will say last year on this Colorado moose the 125gr Grim Reaper Hades fixed 3 blade punched through her from 65 yards and I never found the arrow. The blood trail wasn't the greatest but she was dead in under 100 yards.
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JakeH

Long Time Member
Messages
3,402
Yes I know they are meant to open inside the ribs. I'm not so much worried about the entrance hole as I am what it does inside, but they didn't seem to do much on that aspect either.
I would be damn concerned if my broadhead wasn't creating a decent entry hole. If it's opened up on the outside it will be opened up on the inside.

I'm just pointing out that the mechanic head you chose was a poor one to judge off of.

Personally I will be shooting NAP shock waves. Killed my bull last year with them, and have a buddy that has killed 20+ bulls with them.
 

Bookhead

Very Active Member
Messages
1,191
The first animal I shot with a fixed blade was an antelope at about 30 yards used a montec g5. Broke both its front shoulders like it'd been shot with a rifle, front legs were floppy. His face hit the dirt immediately and he pushed about 10 yards with his back feet and died 10 yards from where I shot him. Never looked back since and that was about 30 big game animals ago but I also like annihilator broadheads and shuttle t's. Also the first time you run your hand across one of the broken blades of an expandable inside the chest cavity of an animal that'll make you think twice about using them
 
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MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
I would be damn concerned if my broadhead wasn't creating a decent entry hole. If it's opened up on the outside it will be opened up on the inside.

I'm just pointing out that the mechanic head you chose was a poor one to judge off of.

Personally I will be shooting NAP shock waves. Killed my bull last year with them, and have a buddy that has killed 20+ bulls with them.
I went with it because it has a ton of good reviews for deer and wanted to try it with elk. Needless to say they went in the trash and the fixed blades came back out. Levi Morgan shoots these and other guys have tested em. But my experience isn't good with them.

I know guys who stand by the rage 2 blade mechanicals for elk, but those are rear deploying too.
 

JakeH

Long Time Member
Messages
3,402
I went with it because it has a ton of good reviews for deer and wanted to try it with elk. Needless to say they went in the trash and the fixed blades came back out. Levi Morgan shoots these and other guys have tested em. But my experience isn't good with them.

I know guys who stand by the rage 2 blade mechanicals for elk, but those are rear deploying too.
Rage and shwackers are not even remotely the same, rages are designed to be fully open when they hit and should create a fully open entrance hole. Shwhackers not so much.
 

Bigwiffy

Very Active Member
Messages
1,012
I've shot a lot of mechs and fixed. Have shot Grim Reapers, Deadmeat, Rage, Shockwave, all worked, but I lost my confidence in them.....Now shoot Ramcats, Slicktrick, and Wasp all fixed. No reason in my experience to ever go back to a mechanical. More moving parts more chance to fail. Even if they don't.....they could. That messes with my head. If a fixed fails it's on me.
 

CFMuley

Active Member
Messages
465
Well that's the assumption, cause when I found the arrow it was partially opened. But coulda opened on the ground. And when you see the same little rag horn bull with a distinct eye guard and a blood stain behind the shoulder your arrow exited then it's pretty obvious that's the bull I shot.
You’re saying you got a pass through and saw the same elk days later?
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
You’re saying you got a pass through and saw the same elk days later?
Yep. In and out. Exit wound was a little bigger but it surely wasn't the 2.5 inch cut that was supposed to happen. Watched him walk around and everything for about an hour without getting another shot.
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
Just Figured I would update this thread with my own personal terminal reports now. I spoke with a few dudes who have killed literally hundreds of animals between them. They each individually recommended the Grim Reaper 1 3/8" pro mechanical. I was leaning more towards a mechanical for the forgiveness they provide versus a fixed blade anyways, and I believed I had the energy to shoot them.

I decided to shoot the 1 3/8" pro mechanical for both of my elk hunts. I killed two bulls with 2 arrows. A double lung shot at 51 yards (21" of penetration before he snapped the arrow) and a double lung full pass through at 68 yards on my second bull. Could not ask for any better performance. Probably all I will ever shoot now.

80lb Hoyt Ventum 33 Pro. 30" draw. 520 grain arrow going 290FPS.

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bubba

Member
Messages
44
Just shot a small 5 in Wyoming with 100gr SWACKER and the Bull didn't got 10yards. It died with in 1 minute of hitting him. Slight quarter down hill shot. One blade was bent but in tacked and the other straight as new. Double lunged him.
 

Horsecorn

Active Member
Messages
733
You mechanical guys crack me up. telling about bulls you’ve shot and killed with them. Sure you can kill them, I’ve killed deer with a home made arrow and rock arrow heads Just like the Indians did for thousands of years. One of these times you’ll lose a bull to one of them and then your going to go ohh shi-.
 

DaveD

Member
Messages
15
I have guided and hunted elk since the 80s. Between myself and my hunters and friends, I have been a part of around 100 elk kills. One thing is for sure- everything isn't always as it seems. People often think they have made a great shot when is reality they did not. In all my years I have never seen an elk lost that was hit in the lungs with an arrow, regardless of what broad head the hunter chooses. Poke a hole through both lungs and the elk is dead, period. Get only one lung and the elk will die but it will take longer.

This bull was alive well after the archery season had closed. I guarantee the hunter (who remains unknown) thinks he made a perfect shot. In reality the arrow never penetrated the lungs.
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Confidence in your equipment is the deciding factor imo. A hunter needs to feel good about what he is sending into that elk. For that reason, there really isn't a right or wrong. Today's mechanicals are every bit as reliable as some of the fixed blades from 20 years ago. They work just fine and open up every time. Today's fixed blades are also much more advanced and cut a nice hole every time. Both cause massive hemorrhaging in the chest cavity when the hunter does his job. Bottom line is choose what you feel the best with and take ethical shots.

Happy hunting.
 

Bookhead

Very Active Member
Messages
1,191
I have guided and hunted elk since the 80s. Between myself and my hunters and friends, I have been a part of around 100 elk kills. One thing is for sure- everything isn't always as it seems. People often think they have made a great shot when is reality they did not. In all my years I have never seen an elk lost that was hit in the lungs with an arrow, regardless of what broad head the hunter chooses. Poke a hole through both lungs and the elk is dead, period. Get only one lung and the elk will die but it will take longer.

This bull was alive well after the archery season had closed. I guarantee the hunter (who remains unknown) thinks he made a perfect shot. In reality the arrow never penetrated the lungs.
View attachment 87803

Confidence in your equipment is the deciding factor imo. A hunter needs to feel good about what he is sending into that elk. For that reason, there really isn't a right or wrong. Today's mechanicals are every bit as reliable as some of the fixed blades from 20 years ago. They work just fine and open up every time. Today's fixed blades are also much more advanced and cut a nice hole every time. Both cause massive hemorrhaging in the chest cavity when the hunter does his job. Bottom line is choose what you feel the best with and take ethical shots.

Happy hunting.
Agreed but if I was a betting man there's a mechanical on the end of that 😆
 

DaveD

Member
Messages
15
Agreed but if I was a betting man there's a mechanical on the end of that 😆
Five... the number of fixed blades I have found in elk shoulders through the years. All were old wounds that the elk had recovered from completely. A fatty cyst was formed around the blades and the elk showed no visible problems. Two... the number of mechanicals I have found similarly through the years.

A bad shot is a bad shot, regardless of what is on the end of your arrow.

For what it is worth, I have also found 2 bullets lodged against shoulders through the years. Both lighter caliber that appeared to over expand - failing to penetrate.
 

Huntnful

Active Member
Messages
105
I have guided and hunted elk since the 80s. Between myself and my hunters and friends, I have been a part of around 100 elk kills. One thing is for sure- everything isn't always as it seems. People often think they have made a great shot when is reality they did not. In all my years I have never seen an elk lost that was hit in the lungs with an arrow, regardless of what broad head the hunter chooses. Poke a hole through both lungs and the elk is dead, period. Get only one lung and the elk will die but it will take longer.

This bull was alive well after the archery season had closed. I guarantee the hunter (who remains unknown) thinks he made a perfect shot. In reality the arrow never penetrated the lungs.
View attachment 87803

Confidence in your equipment is the deciding factor imo. A hunter needs to feel good about what he is sending into that elk. For that reason, there really isn't a right or wrong. Today's mechanicals are every bit as reliable as some of the fixed blades from 20 years ago. They work just fine and open up every time. Today's fixed blades are also much more advanced and cut a nice hole every time. Both cause massive hemorrhaging in the chest cavity when the hunter does his job. Bottom line is choose what you feel the best with and take ethical shots.

Happy hunting.
Couldn't agree more. I cannot, under any circumstances, imagine an animal surviving a well placed shot from my setup now. A bad shot is a bad shot, no matter the broadhead, so that doesn't matter much at all IMO. Also the comment about sharpness is also spot on.
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
I've found that (as stated before), mechanical and fixed both work reliably these days. I personally have shot both and enjoy a good fixed over a mechanical FOR ELK. For deer and antelope a mechanical absolutely could be an awesome addition to someone's set up. Also (as stated before) a fixed blade won't out prefore a mech on a bad shot, and vice versa. You could shoot the biggest bull with a field tip in both lungs and have a good chance at killing him.
 

roadrunner

Long Time Member
Messages
4,458
I wouldn't hesitate to use a Rocket Steelhead on elk. I will likely not use a Swhacker on elk again. Deer sized game, yes, every day of the week.
 

Soccerdude

Active Member
Messages
531
I used rocket steal heads for years on whitetail deer in the Midwest and back east with very good results. They were killers. When I moved west I started using fix blades on elk and kept shooting steelheads on antelope and deer. I shot a bull this past week with NAP Hellrazor 125 fixed blade. Not impressed. I will continue to look for a better fixed blade. Maybe tooth of the arrow or annilator...
 

MountainSqwabler

Active Member
Messages
367
I used rocket steal heads for years on whitetail deer in the Midwest and back east with very good results. They were killers. When I moved west I started using fix blades on elk and kept shooting steelheads on antelope and deer. I shot a bull this past week with NAP Hellrazor 125 fixed blade. Not impressed. I will continue to look for a better fixed blade. Maybe tooth of the arrow or annilator...
I've found anything with the style of those hellrazors has (g5 montec, and whatever those muzzys are) they suck. Idk why but I've seen nothing but negative. Animator and TOTA are good but they are pretty small imo. I've shot NAP Thunderheads and they worked well, and I'm going to the magnus black hornets for next year.
 

JakeH

Long Time Member
Messages
3,402
I have guided and hunted elk since the 80s. Between myself and my hunters and friends, I have been a part of around 100 elk kills. One thing is for sure- everything isn't always as it seems. People often think they have made a great shot when is reality they did not. In all my years I have never seen an elk lost that was hit in the lungs with an arrow, regardless of what broad head the hunter chooses. Poke a hole through both lungs and the elk is dead, period. Get only one lung and the elk will die but it will take longer.

This bull was alive well after the archery season had closed. I guarantee the hunter (who remains unknown) thinks he made a perfect shot. In reality the arrow never penetrated the lungs.
View attachment 87803

Confidence in your equipment is the deciding factor imo. A hunter needs to feel good about what he is sending into that elk. For that reason, there really isn't a right or wrong. Today's mechanicals are every bit as reliable as some of the fixed blades from 20 years ago. They work just fine and open up every time. Today's fixed blades are also much more advanced and cut a nice hole every time. Both cause massive hemorrhaging in the chest cavity when the hunter does his job. Bottom line is choose what you feel the best with and take ethical shots.

Happy hunting.
My buddy shot a bull last year with a muzzy trocar I believe. Arrow passed through both lungs and was buried into a tree on the other side. Shot was right at dark so he backed out and came back the next morning with help to track, and pack out the bull.

They get on the blood trail and 100-150 yards from the shot the bull jumps up and busts out of there. He was flabbergasted as he was sure he hit him great. They ended up jumping the bull 3 more times before finally getting another Arrow in him. Shot was perfect, maybe a little high but went through both lungs.

After quarters were pulled he decided to open up the ribs and see what happened. One lung was destroyed and collapsed, and the other still looked good but had a perfect 3 blade hole through it. The bull was able to stay going on just that one compromised lung. They are extremely tough critters. He has a picture of the lung with the 3 blade hole in it.

Edit: found the picture.
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Jayman

Member
Messages
13
When it comes to elk I have had better past performance with fixed cut on contact heads but at longer distances the mech. in general fly better. I used a Rage Trypan this year on a huge body elk shot him broadside sight quartering away. Cut totally through one rib, double lunged him and stopped in far shoulder/leg. Tip has slight bend but blades still sharp and straight.

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Jeremy2019

Member
Messages
43
Shot and lost a bull Tuesday 25 yard broadside shot know I got at least one lung from all the bubbles in the blood. Will never use a mechanical again, had planned to only use them for a follow up shot just to open a bigger hole but grabbed it by mistake won't happen again because they won't be in my quiver again. Was using the rage+p for reference
 

tracker12

Very Active Member
Messages
1,389
Shot and lost a bull Tuesday 25 yard broadside shot know I got at least one lung from all the bubbles in the blood. Will never use a mechanical again, had planned to only use them for a follow up shot just to open a bigger hole but grabbed it by mistake won't happen again because they won't be in my quiver again. Was using the rage+p for reference
Don't blame the BH If you can hit two lungs and 25 yards .
 

Jeremy2019

Member
Messages
43
Don't blame the BH If you can hit two lungs and 25 yards .
Well besides it glancing off a rib not sure what else would have caused the elk to make it more than 100 yards was nowhere near hitting shoulder or shoulder blade. About the only thing that could have happened was blades not deploy right and essentially shot him with a field tip. Didn't even poke out the other side at all my fix blades would have blown all the way through just like they have in the past. I think my hunter safety instructor had it right, a mechanical device can and will fail.
 

roadrunner

Long Time Member
Messages
4,458
Well besides it glancing off a rib not sure what else would have caused the elk to make it more than 100 yards was nowhere near hitting shoulder or shoulder blade. About the only thing that could have happened was blades not deploy right and essentially shot him with a field tip. Didn't even poke out the other side at all my fix blades would have blown all the way through just like they have in the past. I think my hunter safety instructor had it right, a mechanical device can and will fail.

A release aid and a compound bow are mechanical devices as well...
 

Hunt4more

Active Member
Messages
972
I watched a 125gr Rocket Steelhead mechanical go through a mature bull at 78 yards. It was quartering hard toward us and the hunter put it right behind the left shoulder crease. The arrow traveled through the body and the broadhead was sticking out the other side. Bull went 30 yards and tipped over.
I’ve watch a 80# 31 inch draw shooting FMJ’s with rage 2 blades hit a bull at 12 yards quartering towards hit right behind the shoulder after a mile we lost the trail/track. The broadhead was recovered and the blades totally broke. All I needed to see to know that’s not for me. I believe a solid fixed blade and we would of had a recovery.
 

El Gringo

Active Member
Messages
781
Mechanicals work amazing…. Until they don’t. That’s been my experience. Either crime scene trauma, or absolutely nothing at all.
 

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