Is twice the price twice the scope?

jordan hunter

Member
Messages
12
In the market for a new scope to put on a Browning x bolt in 6.8 Western when it arrives I've looked through quite a few and the two that have impressed me the most so far have been The Burris signature HD and the leupold vx5 HD. The Leopold is twice the price, I don't have unlimited funds and I'm very willing to pay for great quality, but I'm just struggling with whether or not I should really be spending double for an optic where they both seemed crisp and clear, had excellent field of view, and reports of low light transmission appear to be very good for both.
Looking at them in the store, I liked both of them equally, but my fear is that once I get out in the field it will be a different story at first light when my once in a lifetime elk is moving through the timber. most of my shots at elk have been about 8:30 in the morning very few in the first minutes of daylight, but I don't want to cheap out here and miss out on the week of a lifetime down the road.
any thoughts on the two Scopes that I mentioned and whether or not I'd really be disappointed in The Burris signature HD and 44 mm?
 

gr8fuldoug

Site Sponsor
Messages
1,737
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heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,189
I have several of the VX-5 HD, and really like them. I have the Swarovski Z3 and it is great as well. I would say with all optics, you get what you pay for, especially in poor lighting.
 

DH56

Active Member
Messages
772
Buy the best optics you can afford. Don’t skimp. I have at least a dozen leupold scopes and they all have performed in any conditions. The VX-5 HD is a quality scope. Good luck in your decision.
 

willsmith

Member
Messages
15
Yeah, but i will advise you to purchase something you can afford, I have the VX-5HD and it's something that works well for me Thanks
 

30Hart

Very Active Member
Messages
1,566
To answer your question yes usually. Buy the most expensive quality scope you can afford with a good warranty. That vx5hd will suit you well. I've used them all and currently have Nightforce NX8s on all my hunting rifles as I feel they give you the most bang for the buck without paying for diminishing returns but they are the next level up from a vx5hd.
 

Rsully661

Member
Messages
45
Look at maven, better than leupold and Burris!!! Take the time to look at reviews of them and I belive they still allow you to try for a couple weeks and return if you don’t like.
 

Sparks Shooter

Active Member
Messages
268
In my opinion, any higher quality scope can be used super effectively to aim at game animals within reasonable ranges. Both of the choices you listed are higher quality. If you don't already have a really good pair of binoculars, buy the cheaper rifle scope and put the money toward your looking glasses. My binos kill way more deer than my rifle scopes. I do keep my shots much closer than some though. If you must fling bullets at far distant animals, rifle scopes become much more important. ------SS
 

AndesNY

New Member
Messages
4
I've been looking at both scopes as I'm ready for an upgrade to go on my Hells Canyon 300 WSM prior to an elk hunt this Fall. After reading a lot of forums to get a solid understanding of what really matters I agree with Sparks to some extent as the glass in your scope needs to be good but not the glass on your binos is almost more important. What does seem to really matter on a scope and this doesn't seem to be mentioned here but has extensively on other forums is reliability (i.e. return to zero and drop tested), we never plan on dropping our guns but it can and does happen especially in steep terrain, when you've dropped a bunch of coin on a hunt, its not the time to question if you're equipment will fail. Based on what I've read about this, there is little info on the Burris but the VX5HD is seems to show there is a chance it can fail. The Leupolds look stunning and the glass is very good if not great but does all of that matter if you get that one shot and miss because your scope is off? This has been looking at scopesk like Nightforce which I wasn't even considering... anyway two cents from a guy that is probably repeating what I'v read elsewhere
 

Bluehair

Long Time Member
Messages
5,759
I don’t drop my rifle very often, and I’m pretty sure I could break whatever scope I threw on the ground.

Although I agree that impact resistance is important, it just seems like this is about #20 on the list of practical considerations.
 
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S-3 Ranch

Active Member
Messages
124
IMO find a $400-$500 scope in leupold, Burris, tricon, zeiss, vortex
lot of these companies have merged and quality is sound
I had a Burris signature on my .300wm and though heavy was best optical I ever owned
 

heywouldya

Very Active Member
Messages
1,189
I've been looking at both scopes as I'm ready for an upgrade to go on my Hells Canyon 300 WSM prior to an elk hunt this Fall. After reading a lot of forums to get a solid understanding of what really matters I agree with Sparks to some extent as the glass in your scope needs to be good but not the glass on your binos is almost more important. What does seem to really matter on a scope and this doesn't seem to be mentioned here but has extensively on other forums is reliability (i.e. return to zero and drop tested), we never plan on dropping our guns but it can and does happen especially in steep terrain, when you've dropped a bunch of coin on a hunt, its not the time to question if you're equipment will fail. Based on what I've read about this, there is little info on the Burris but the VX5HD is seems to show there is a chance it can fail. The Leupolds look stunning and the glass is very good if not great but does all of that matter if you get that one shot and miss because your scope is off? This has been looking at scopesk like Nightforce which I wasn't even considering... anyway two cents from a guy that is probably repeating what I'v read elsewhere
I have Leupolds on every rifle I own now. I'v tried many of the other brands, but Leupold always works the best for me. I have 2 VH5HD scopes now, and love them.
I know there are other brands people prefer, and I can't argue with that. It's their opinion.
As for bino's, as with scopes, buy the best you can afford.
 

AndesNY

New Member
Messages
4
I don’t drop my rifle very often, and I’m pretty sure I could break whatever scope I threw on the ground.

Although I agree that impact resistance is important, it just seems like this is about #20 on the list of practical considerations.
Honestly, it was not on my list either or at least pretty far down until I read this evaluation on Rokslide. I won't speak for him as he does a fantastic job of explaining that scopes are not for sizing up game but aiming devices, which is the reality. If your aiming device is off, what's the point. He is definitely a lot tougher on his equipment than I would ever be but point is drops do happen and what is the consequence if any of that. Not trying to tell you this should be your #1 consideration but it certainly shouldn't be #20 either but I guess its somewhat subjective, as they say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. What a scope is to you is what you value.
 
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AndesNY

New Member
Messages
4
Cheap scopes and cheap rifles kill elk. I’ve witnessed it first hand for decades. Buy what you like, what you can afford, practice with it and kill with it. It’s not as complicated as some folks want to make it. Good luck on your elk hunt.
You're probably right and I have a very clear Burris Fullfield E1 4.5x14x42 on it now and with that combination, its a tack driver. My concern is I've been waiting a long time, saving points/money and I've now got this stuck in my head that what happens if the gun takes a tumble during the hunt. Will I miss my only shot at that bull because I cheaped out on the scope. If you read some of the torture tests that these scopes get put through, some top quality scopes including Leupold lose zero during the drops. If a $1200 scope is losing zero, what does that mean for a scope made in China? I don't know the answer
 

Captain_coues

Very Active Member
Messages
1,236
Swarovski, Zeiss, Leica, Steiner, Meopta, Leupold, Nightforce. Make sure it’s an HD or better and the higher end, or models made in Germany or the US because some of their lessor are made in China or the Philippines. I’m getting older and shooting much more than in the past. I find I’m slowly replacing all of the 80s and 90s era scopes that are usually 3-9 power to a minimum of 4 and a max of at least 14. Usually I’m going with 3-15 when replacing. My eyes are getting more and more out of whack, so the old scopes are just about worthless for me when shooting at 100 yards. The HD are like a new set of eyes and feels like some of the best money I’ve ever spent. I don’t have much advice on where the price should be, but I go with $800-$1500. The best thing I’ve found is dealing with cameraland and asking if they have a demo model or blemished. That sometimes saves a decent chunk of change.
 

Bigfoot 1

Very Active Member
Messages
1,333
You're probably right and I have a very clear Burris Fullfield E1 4.5x14x42 on it now and with that combination, its a tack driver. My concern is I've been waiting a long time, saving points/money and I've now got this stuck in my head that what happens if the gun takes a tumble during the hunt. Will I miss my only shot at that bull because I cheaped out on the scope. If you read some of the torture tests that these scopes get put through, some top quality scopes including Leupold lose zero during the drops. If a $1200 scope is losing zero, what does that mean for a scope made in China? I don't know the answer
Yes sir, I see your point. What if your vehicle breaks down on the way to your hunt, what if you have a family emergency the day before your hunt, what if you get the flu the morning of your hunt? I always have a spare rifle back at camp just in case. 99% of everything we worry about never happens. Go hunt, have fun, enjoy the experience my friend and don’t worry about anything other than harvesting an elk.
 

AndesNY

New Member
Messages
4
Yup, totally agree... just trying to eliminate as many variables as I can control and scope selection is certainly one we have a choice. Thank you
 

OLDHORNHUNTER

Active Member
Messages
871
In the market for a new scope to put on a Browning x bolt in 6.8 Western when it arrives I've looked through quite a few and the two that have impressed me the most so far have been The Burris signature HD and the leupold vx5 HD. The Leopold is twice the price, I don't have unlimited funds and I'm very willing to pay for great quality, but I'm just struggling with whether or not I should really be spending double for an optic where they both seemed crisp and clear, had excellent field of view, and reports of low light transmission appear to be very good for both.
Looking at them in the store, I liked both of them equally, but my fear is that once I get out in the field it will be a different story at first light when my once in a lifetime elk is moving through the timber. most of my shots at elk have been about 8:30 in the morning very few in the first minutes of daylight, but I don't want to cheap out here and miss out on the week of a lifetime down the road.
any thoughts on the two Scopes that I mentioned and whether or not I'd really be disappointed in The Burris signature HD and 44 mm?
A scope is only as good as what your eyes can see !! I have been with people hunting scouting ETC, that have had Swaro Zeiss Leupold Vortex both binos scopes & spotters And they still can not find the critter or horn !! Go with the best you can afford or the best ones that your eyes see thru !!
 

deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,609
You're probably right and I have a very clear Burris Fullfield E1 4.5x14x42 on it now and with that combination, its a tack driver. My concern is I've been waiting a long time, saving points/money and I've now got this stuck in my head that what happens if the gun takes a tumble during the hunt. Will I miss my only shot at that bull because I cheaped out on the scope. If you read some of the torture tests that these scopes get put through, some top quality scopes including Leupold lose zero during the drops. If a $1200 scope is losing zero, what does that mean for a scope made in China? I don't know the answer
If you are worried about durability then stick with the Burris or get a Nightforce. Burris scopes are rock solid and nobody builds a stronger handgun scope than Burris (yeah I know you're not looking for a pistol scope, just saying). The worst spill any rifle of mine ever took had a 4.5x14 fullfield 2 on it and it never skipped a beat.
 

Jerry

Active Member
Messages
400
Night force NXS or NX8
Burris !!!’ I’ve had only these last 40 plus years- never any problems, tough as nails & super optics & light gathering ability- absolutely reliable ! The best never rest, they are always the best for me. I’d stake my life on them anytime anywhere, any field conditions. Have on 4 rifles.
Jerry Gold- Windsor, Colorado 💥💥💥🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
5,263
I suppose I’ve been fortunate……… I’ve never owned a very top end scope. From Weavers, Tascos, back in the 60’s, Leopolds and Nikons, in 80s and 90s, and Vortex in the 2000s.

I’m a big, heavy (fat) guy. I fall and roll around in the dirt……. a lot, I’ve have dropped a fair number rifles in the rocks and on the scope. Gouges on some of them a 1/8” deep. Had airlines drop gun cases on the pavement etc etc. I can never remember knocking a scope off center. Not once.

Just my personal experience, for what it’s with.
 

tracker12

Very Active Member
Messages
1,348
I can kill elk with a cheap scope if it does not fog up in bad conditions. Do I want to take that chance? NOOOO! Plus for I hate looking thru cheap glass. I'll spend a few extra dollars and get a decent scope. I have Leupolds I have owned since 1972 that are still going strong. And the VX5 HD is very nice.
 

DH56

Active Member
Messages
772
Buy the best glass you can afford. To make longer shots under poor light conditions you need good optics. Skimping here may cost you a once in a lifetime opportunity.
 

Zeke

Long Time Member
Messages
9,824
"Is twice the price, twice the scope?"

That's a loaded question but I'll add my 2 cents:

Possibly but not always!

Twice the price might have more gadgetry but not a bit better optics. All depends on what YOU want.

You've read 100 opinions on this thread and few agree 100% but that doesn't mean anyone is wrong... or right.

The better optics are simply better and cost real dough. Next thing you'll pay for are the features and gadgets on the scope like turrets, illumination, various crosshairs, objective lens size, adjustable objectives, higher magnification, main tube size and on and on.

Zeke
 

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