My Continental Divide Trail Adventure Thus Far

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
Yellowstone!

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cbat

Active Member
Messages
383
Are you using any trail books ? Or recommend any?
I have been thinking of starting the PCT but may consider this instead.
 

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
Are you using any trail books ? Or recommend any?
I have been thinking of starting the PCT but may consider this instead.
I'm not using any trail books. I only selected the CDT because it runs near my home. I've since learned that it is generally considered the most difficult of the three triple-crown trails. It certainly is the longest. The PCT may be a better choice for your first thru-hike attempt. From what I've learned from those who have hiked it, it was initially graded for horses, so not nearly as steep. Also a lot more people hiking it if you like that instead of long periods of solitude. I personally initially thought I would like the solitude, but now I've learned that I enjoy it more when I have someone to hike with.

I think YouTube is as good of source as any to get a sense of what each of the trails would be like.
 

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
So......I want to hear about the dead head holder...
She is a very attractive lady from Georgia that teaches handicapped kids how to ride horses. She's also married to the other guy I've been hiking with off and on since day two. Two of the finest people I've ever met. Sorry...

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mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
I'm off trail for the next three weeks I got off at West Yellowstone and caught a flight back to NM. I went almost two months without seeing any of my family and it's been really good to see all of them again.

I'm down 48 lbs now.

Most of these are already famous pics, but some more of Yellowstone:

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NMPaul

Moderator
Messages
7,959
I'm off trail for the next three weeks I got off at West Yellowstone and caught a flight back to NM. I went almost two months without seeing any of my family and it's been really good to see all of them again.

I'm down 48 lbs now.

Most of these are already famous pics, but some more of Yellowstone:

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I want to see the pictures of you petting the buffalo. LOL
 

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
Here is a list of my gear. I think this list is complete, but if I think of anything else that I missed, I'll add it later.

For the entire trail:
Big Three
:
Zpacks Arc Haul 62 Liter Backpack, 22.1 oz
Zpacks Duplex Tent, 18.5 oz
Zpacks Full Zip 10 degree Sleeping Bag, 26.9 oz
Total weight of big three: 4 lbs 3.5 oz

Nemo Switchback Ultralight Sleeping Pad (use both as a sitting
pad and under air mattress to prevent punctures)
Sea to Summit Etherlight Air Mattress
Sea to Summit Aeros Premium Large Air Pillow
Custom made silk pillowcase
Sea to Summit Thermolite Reactor Sleeping Bag Liner

LEKI Micro Vario COR-TEC TA AntiShock Trekking Poles (in my
opinion, cork handles are a must)

Mobile phone with FarOut CDT App
Garmin InReach Explorer with Tracking/SOS subscription
Nitecore headlamp
SanDisk Clip Sport Plus loaded with 600+ songs and several
audio books
Clarmast 28,500 mA charger
Wall plug with two USB ports and two USB cables

20-gallon trash compactor bag (used as pack liner)

Sawyer Squeeze water filter
2 32-oz Sawyer Squeeze bags
Sawyer Squeeze double coupler fits filter and smart water
bottle
Custom made Sawyer Squeeze sock (to insulate it from freezing
at night)
50-ml syringe (to backflush Sawyer Squeeze)
2 replacement o-rings for Sawyer Squeeze
3 Smart Water bottles

Zpacks foodsack

Zpacks wallet

Waterproof wristwatch

The Deuce #2 shovel
Toilet paper
Culo Clean bidet
Baby wipes
Empty Gatorade bottle (saves me from having to get out of the
tent 3 or 4 times per night)

Altra Lone Peak 6.0 trailrunners (a half size larger than my foot to help with all the times I accidently kick rocks and roots)
Altra gaiters
Mosquito headnet
Outdoor Research Sun Runner cap
Outdoor Research Sun Hoodie
Outdoor Research ActiveIce Sun Gloves
Kuhl convertible hiking pants
2 pairs of Darn Tough ¼ midweight hiking socks
2 pairs of Injiji Liner Crew NuWool socks
Columbia fishing shirt (I keep this clean/nice to wear in town
and when I’m trying to hitch a ride)
2 pairs of moisture wicking under shorts
Enlightened Equipment Visp rain jacket
Zpacks rain pants
Enlightened Equipment Torrid Custom Jacket
Zpacks windbreaker
Smartwool Merino 250 thermal top
Smartwook Merino 250 thermal bottoms
Smartwool Merino 250 stocking cap
Smartwool liner gloves
Buff
Sunglasses

TOAKS Titanium 750ml Pot
TOAKS Titanium Long Handle Spoon
Talenti plastic ice cream container
Pocket Rocket Stove
7.75 oz blended fuel canister
Lighter
Victorinox Swiss Army Classic SD Pocket Knife

Toothbrush
Travel size toothpaste
Dental floss
Travel size deodorant (for in town and when I’m trying to hitch
a ride)
Body Glide (anti-chaffing)
1 roll of Leukotape
Spare contact lenses and eyeglasses
Ibuprofen and aspirin
Band Aids
Sunscreen
Lip balm
Mosquito repellent

Only for southern NM:
Zpacks umbrella (not for the rain, but for the sun)

Only For San Juans in Colorado:
Neve Camp Ice Ax
Micro spikes


Only For Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana
Bear Spray
50’ of paracord


I've gotten a little ribbing from some of my fellow hikers for the clean town shirt and the deodorant. However, I feel like the clean town shirt increases my chances of getting hitches when I come off the trail and need a ride to the nearest town (usually more than ten miles). I'll usually stop at the last water source before the road and try to clean up as much as possible and then put on the deodorant and the clean shirt. If nothing else, it makes me feel a little less self-conscious when I'm in the car with whoever was kind enough to pick up a guy that looks a little bit like Mike Ehrmantraut... :)
 
Last edited:

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
5,416
Here is a list of my gear. I think this list is complete, but if I think of anything else that I missed, I'll add it later.

For the entire trail:
Big Three
:
Zpacks Arc Haul 62 Liter Backpack, 22.1 oz
Zpacks Duplex Tent, 18.5 oz
Zpacks Full Zip 10 degree Sleeping Bag, 26.9 oz
Total weight of big three: 4 lbs 3.5 oz

Nemo Switchback Ultralight Sleeping Pad (use both as a sitting
pad and to under air mattress to prevent punctures)
Sea to Summit Etherlight Air Mattress
Sea to Summit Aeros Premium Large Air Pillow
Custom made silk pillowcase
Sea to Summit Thermolite Reactor Sleeping Bag Liner

LEKI Micro Vario COR-TEC TA AntiShock Trekking Poles (in my
opinion, cork handles are a must)

Mobile phone with FarOut CDT App
Garmin InReach Explorer with Tracking/SOS subscription
Nitecore headlamp
SanDisk Clip Sport Plus loaded with 600+ songs and several
audio books
Clarmast 28,500 mA charger
Wall plug with two USB ports and two USB cables

20-gallon trash compactor bag (used as pack liner)

Sawyer Squeeze water filter
2 32-oz Sawyer Squeeze bags
Sawyer Squeeze double coupler fits filter and smart water
bottle
Custom made Sawyer Squeeze sock (to insulate it from freezing
at night)
50-ml syringe (to backflush Sawyer Squeeze)
2 replacement o-rings for Sawyer Squeeze
3 Smart Water bottles

Zpacks foodsack

Zpacks wallet

Waterproof wristwatch

The Deuce #2 shovel
Toilet paper
Culo Clean bidet
Baby wipes
Empty Gatorade bottle (saves me from having to get out of the
tent 3 or 4 times per night)

Altra Lone Peak 6.0 trailrunners (a half size larger than my foot to help with all the times I accidently kick rocks and roots)
Altra gaiters
Mosquito headnet
Outdoor Research Sun Runner cap
Outdoor Research Sun Hoodie
Outdoor Research ActiveIce Sun Gloves
Kuhl convertible hiking pants
2 pairs of Darn Tough ¼ midweight hiking socks
2 pairs of Injiji Liner Crew NuWool socks
Columbia fishing shirt (I keep this clean/nice to wear in town
and when I’m trying to hitch a ride)
2 pairs of moisture wicking under shorts
Enlightened Equipment Visp rain jacket
Zpacks rain pants
Enlightened Equipment Torrid Custom Jacket
Zpacks windbreaker
Smartwool Merino 250 thermal top
Smartwook Merino 250 thermal bottoms
Smartwool Merino 250 stocking cap
Buff
Sunglasses

TOAKS Titanium 750ml Pot
TOAKS Titanium Long Handle Spoon
Talenti plastic ice cream container
Pocket Rocket Stove
7.75 oz blended fuel canister
Lighter
Victorinox Swiss Army Classic SD Pocket Knife

Toothbrush
Travel size toothpaste
Dental floss
Travel size deodorant (for in town and when I’m trying to hitch
a ride)
Body Glide (anti-chaffing)
1 roll of Leukotape
Spare contact lenses and eyeglasses
Ibuprofen and aspirin
Band Aids
Sunscreen
Lip balm
Mosquito repellent

Only for southern NM:
Zpacks umbrella (not for the rain, but for the sun)

Only For San Juans in Colorado:
Neve Camp Ice Ax
Micro spikes


Only For Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana
Bear Spray
50’ of paracord


I've gotten a little ribbing from some of my fellow hikers for the clean town shirt and the deodorant. However, I feel like the clean town shirt increases my chances of getting hitches when I come off the trail and need a ride to the nearest town (usually more than ten miles). I'll usually stop at the last water source before the road and try to clean up as much as possible and then put on the deodorant and the clean shirt. If nothing else, it makes me feel a little less self-conscious when I'm in the car with whoever was kind enough to pick up a guy that looks a little bit like Mike Ehrmantraut... :)
Excellent list. Tried and tested, for sure.

Typical weight of your pack?
 

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
Excellent list. Tried and tested, for sure.

Typical weight of your pack?
The only thing I know for sure is the weight of the Big 3, which in my case being less than five pounds is awesome. My Dragon Fly hunting pack weighs more than that empty. But otherwise, I've never tried to weigh it. My best guess is that it's probably about 25 lbs before food and water.

Coming out of towns, I can really feel the difference when loaded down with food for 4 or 5 days, and vice versa on days when I'm headed into town and my food is mostly eaten. I've also been eating a lot more food the further I get along the trail, so that weight is actually getting heavier as I progress. It seems like I'm constantly hungry now, and each snack makes the hunger pain go away for at most 30 minutes.

Southern NM was also pretty brutal on 20+ mile water carry days because I would load up with as much as two gallons of water (16 lbs) before starting in the morning. But that problem mostly went away after getting to northern NM where water has since been abundant, and I usually don't need to carry more than one or two liters to get me through to the next available water source.
 

2lumpy

Long Time Member
Messages
5,416
The only thing I know for sure is the weight of the Big 3, which in my case being less than five pounds is awesome. My Dragon Fly hunting pack weighs more than that empty. But otherwise, I've never tried to weigh it. My best guess is that it's probably about 25 lbs before food and water.

Coming out of towns, I can really feel the difference when loaded down with food for 4 or 5 days, and vice versa on days when I'm headed into town and my food is mostly eaten. I've also been eating a lot more food the further I get along the trail, so that weight is actually getting heavier as I progress. It seems like I'm constantly hungry now, and each snack makes the hunger pain go away for at most 30 minutes.

Southern NM was also pretty brutal on 20+ mile water carry days because I would load up with as much as two gallons of water (16 lbs) before starting in the morning. But that problem mostly went away after getting to northern NM where water has since been abundant, and I usually don't need to carry more than one or two liters to get me through to the next available water source.
Interesting regarding hunger and food Mos. About 35 years ago when this muzzleloader mountain reenactment stuff craze got fired up, some group like the sierra club ( not sure it was them though) sponsored a contest, hiking endurance, weigh loss, survival etc. etc. to see which kind of gear and food would do best over an extended period in the wildness, and hiking. Four different kinds of groups with different kinds of equipment were invited to participate, to determine which “style” of wilderness hiking was most efficient. Each group was made up of four outdoorsy types of people. There was a group of all women, a group of men with various kinds of canned food, and traditional hiking gear but nothing in the freeze dried, water treatment equipment etc type stuff, another group that had ever conceivable kind of modern hiking camping device know to the world at the time, including the nylon tents, freeze dried foods, gas stoves, water petrifies etc. etc. and a third group I don’t recall what there gig was and the last group was four middle aged modern muzzleloader-trapper type of guys .

All I remember about it was it was supposed to go for about four or five weeks. After about two weeks they called it of, mostly over exhaustion, and loss of energy. The mountain men-trapper group was declared the winner. When asked what they attributed the win to the group claimed it was because almost all of there food had been an old fashion supply of pemmican made of buffalo fat, ground meet mixed with crushed wild berries and a good supply of venison jerky. High fat meat protein kept their hungry almost non- existent,

Funny though, here I am, without a clue……. making suggestion to you, who’s living it and I couldn’t walk a mile in your shoes.

Hope you have a great sheep hunt and fulfill another dream this summer. Be safe Mos.
 

mozey

Very Active Member
Messages
2,831
LOL--no worries about making suggestions--I'm fairly new to this too. I think in the end the best advice I've went with is to just "listen to your body and it will tell you what you need or what needs attention." I have made a conscious effort to consume more protein and one of my mainstays is beef sticks. I average 3 or 4 a day. I do believe they make a notable difference.

If I get a home stop (like right now), I can take some of my own venison jerky (which is still my favorite of all jerky) with me. I don't add preservatives so I otherwise have to keep it in the freezer until I'm ready to eat it, but it will be good for a least a week or two once I get it on trail. I could probably have my wife mail me some as well the next time she mails me shoes.
 

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