Staying Warm While Waiting

soupcreek

Active Member
Messages
244
I am curious about other people's thoughts about staying warm. A tactic frequently used is to hike to a vantage point in the dark and wait for the lights to come on. I have had much success with this in the past and plan on using it in the future, but sometimes sitting there gets crazy cold! It takes a little effort to get to the vantage point, so even if I go slow, I am a little sweaty upon arrival.
What are some tricks you guys use to stay warm while sitting? I will be hunting at 7000+ feet in late October in Montana. It will be anywhere from 0 to 20 degrees when I am sitting. I've done it before and I will do it again, but I'd just like to do it more comfortably.
Any thoughts?
Thanks,
Soup
 

Blank

Very Active Member
Messages
2,803
Start out your hike a little cool, with a heavier jacket and/or wind proof shell to put on when you stop. Mittens are warmer than gloves. I like a small foam pad to sit on. If I plan on being there 30 min or more, I loosen up my boot laces to improve foot circulation
 

feddoc

Long Time Member
Messages
4,743
Isometric muscle contractions release most of the energy developed as heat. If you do nothing more than tense and release your muscles, that action will develop heat.

For you older guys, think of the old Charles Atlas instruction guides. His theories put into practice did develop muscles, but, that strength wasn't very functional when compared to other full range of motion exercises.
 

Deepcolor

Active Member
Messages
592
Keep a dry insulation layer in your pack and put it on after you have cooled off a little. I think that waiting until you have stopped sweating really helps. Foam ass pad, good gloves and good stocking cap.
 

OLDHORNHUNTER

Active Member
Messages
943
Throw a lite weight down jacket in a roll up dry bag in your pack. When you get to you glassing spot find a dry out of the wind spot , I always pack a small piece of foam pad to sit on if the ground is froze or snow & of course if its winter wool beanie gloves/mittens . I am a 100% believer in the wool base layers ,and one of mine always has the hoodie. I was amazed how much wind they keep off the back of a sweaty cold neck !! & really help to keep the heat in your core
 

travishunter3006

Very Active Member
Messages
1,850
Like everyone else has said... don't sweat. Don't get wet. I personally lose the layers but I also plan extra time to hike in where ever I'm going so I don't have to push myself to the point of sweating.
 

desperatehills

Active Member
Messages
873
I can't avoid sweating so I keep a long sleeve fleece shirt in my pack and change it out with my wet shirt when I get to the top. This makes all the difference in the world. When I have been with other people they look at me strange when I strip down to change but I am ALWAYS more comfortable than they are
 

marley

Very Active Member
Messages
2,036
I have a "sleeping quilt" that is down and only weighs a little over a pound and packs down really small. If it's really cold I wrap it around my legs while I'm glassing.
 

JPickett

Active Member
Messages
337
Merino wool is your best friend in n the mountains. Warm even when it’s wet. That and as high a grade down jacket as you can afford. Picked up the kuiu super down pro this year and don’t regret a single dollar of the 400 plus it cost me. Packed out an elk this weekend in the pouring rain. Got back to the quad soaked and about 35 out.wet Merino base layers and threw that coat on. I was actually hot on the 30 minute ride back to camp
 

ddsflyfisher

Active Member
Messages
151
It cannot be stated enough- no coat going in, merino wool base layers.

Little story- its one of my brother-in-laws favorite memories of me with my older boys (9 and 11 at the time) as we were hiking all uphill in the dark with wind and snow blowing in our face to a glassing spot- we stopped to time getting into the area appropriately and one of the boys whispered stutteringly with teeth chattering- "cannnnn weeee putttt our cooatsss on nowww daad?"- should have seen the pleasure on their face as we sat dry afterwards.

Cheers- Dave
 

Founder

Founder Since 1999
Messages
10,096
I usually just get there and shiver. The key is to think about how being super cold and shivering burns calories. ha ha:)
Seriously, the suggestions already posted are all good. I typically have a full size backpack with me, so I have my layers in there on the hike in. Once there, I put all my extra clothes on.
Sometimes, you just can't haul enough stuff to stay warm. You wit on a windy point in sub-freezing temps for 4-5 hours and you'll get cold. When I do that, then about every half hour or so you may catch me running a 100 yards down the trail and running back. Maybe do it twice. Get that heart pounding and blood pumping.
 

JPickett

Active Member
Messages
337
Another thing I meant to mention is no cotton whatsoever. Merino and synthetics, cotton gets wet and stays wet.
 
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beech18

Active Member
Messages
493
I do the same as mentioned. Walk slow to try to avoid sweating and layer up once at your glassing point. If it’s cold enough I’ll pack acouple hand warmers with me. I too have issues with sweating Easily so it’s a battle.
 

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