What’s your #1 tip for Coues

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
I’m less than 8 weeks away from my first Coues hunt. Since even before learning that I drew a tag, I have been researching, reading & watching videos. Since drawing a tag, I have spent countless hours studying topo maps, Google Earth & talking to a few folks that have hunted them. I’m getting pretty excited!!!
What would be your number one tip for a first time Coues hunter?
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
Messages
608
I can't wait to hear from the experts. My couple of Coues hunts taught me that nothing I learned elk hunting applies!

(But I'll bet it has something to do with staking out on a high point in an area with known deer bedding, glassing all day, and taking a longer shot than you might be comfortable with).
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
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1,259
I appreciate every shred of advice that I can get. I’m from back east & have killed more whitetail than I would ever admit. I’m hoping I can blend some experience from mule deer hunting & whitetail to help help me.
I have selected 3 very diverse areas to focus on at least for the first few days. One is a river bed, another is an area with low rolling hills & the last is mountainous.
Please keep the suggestions coming.
 

WHT_MTNMAN

Active Member
Messages
211
PM sent, feel free to contact me. #1 tip has been said above many times so I'll add a couple more.
1. Good glass and Tripod is a favorite way to hunt
2. If you don't want to glass, a lot of Coues like to spend the days in saddles at the top of the mtns.
3.southern units you need to have tough pants to protect your shins and legs
4. Grass is growing really well so they will be hard to see, get high and try to be glassing down.
5. Be patient. They are very small and they will disappear on you.
6. They are homebodies. They live in small areas

Good luck
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
PM sent, feel free to contact me. #1 tip has been said above many times so I'll add a couple more.
1. Good glass and Tripod is a favorite way to hunt
2. If you don't want to glass, a lot of Coues like to spend the days in saddles at the top of the mtns.
3.southern units you need to have tough pants to protect your shins and legs
4. Grass is growing really well so they will be hard to see, get high and try to be glassing down.
5. Be patient. They are very small and they will disappear on you.
6. They are homebodies. They live in small areas

Good luck
Thanks! I got your PM & just texted you. 👍🏻
 

Bluehair

Long Time Member
Messages
6,253
As mentioned, they are tiny guys and are generally pretty slow and cautious, although the bucks will run around during the rut. For the most part, they can stay in one little place all day.

If you think you saw one, or did see one that walked behind a tree or blade of grass keep watching and be patient. I’ve seen them walk behind nothing and not emerge again for hours.

I’ve walked to places where they disappeared and I was sure they gone, only to bust them out. They usually don’t move unless pushed.

Good times; good luck (y)
 

HikeHunt61

Active Member
Messages
608
Yes ^^^

First coues I ever saw: was checking out country when first moved to AZ. Walked across a bench between two stands of timber. Could see everything on the bench- the tallest brush was maybe 24" high. Stepped around a bush and BAM- this deer exploded from right under my feet. I wasn't sure which would kill me- the heart attack or the severe embarrassment.
 

AZGuy

Active Member
Messages
556
Another thing, hunting them with two people is much easier. Once you move in for a stalk the other person should never take their eyes off or him and guide you in. And if you know you are close and not seeing the buck he’s likely still there you just aren’t seeing him, don’t press it if you aren’t seeing them, they are crafty and blow out easy. Be prepared for longer shots if needed.
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
I sincerely appreciate all of the advice guys. It sounds like it will be a fun hunt. I will be hunting with 2 new hunters. My nephew took a doe antelope on his first big game hunt & his friend that is going with us has never hunted. I have my work cut out, but I really want to show them a good time. I believe my nephew is hooked, so I’m sure I have a new hunting buddy I’m him.
 

Ihuntemall

Member
Messages
63
Get good glass, tri-pod and a comfortable seat. If your awake, your face should be glued to the bino’s or spotting scope. if you can, get some elevation to glass. Shoot a lot at long range. Hike away from the roads.
 

Sundevil

New Member
Messages
3
Glass into the sun, looking into the shade. All day. It sucks but you will see more deer.

Also, follow garmin times religiously. If garmin says the best time is 12:00 (noon) to 2:00 then you better be behind your binos from 11:30 to 2:30
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
Glass into the sun, looking into the shade. All day. It sucks but you will see more deer.

Also, follow garmin times religiously. If garmin says the best time is 12:00 (noon) to 2:00 then you better be behind your binos from 11:30 to 2:30
Thanks man! I grew up hunting whitetail back east & I know all about hunting the moon phases & I believe in it 100%. No one could argue their point to make me believe otherwise. I kept a ledger years ago on my deer sightings by moon phase, weather & barometer. I know it works! 👍🏻
 

Leo

Member
Messages
14
-tripod is not optional. Also don’t underestimate the importance of a good smooth tripod head.
-Glassing pad or lightweight stool. Trust me on this. You HAVE to be comfortable or you’re gonna get whooped on the glass.
- glass shade mid day, don’t go back to camp till dark
- glass slow. If you think you’ve looked at everything, look five more times and then twice more after that
- it’s really boring until it’s not

It’s by far my favorite type of hunting. Have fun
 

Zeke

Long Time Member
Messages
9,952
I'm no expert but I've hunted them a half dozen times and I'll echo what above posters have all said. Great info.

I was shocked with the numbers of deer I could find, by comparison, when I'd sit and glass (SLOWLY) into the shadows. Use a grid pattern glassing technique once you've done an initial sweep.

I also love spot and stalk hunting. It's like sheep hunting to me...with more brush. haha

Zeke
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
-tripod is not optional. Also don’t underestimate the importance of a good smooth tripod head.
-Glassing pad or lightweight stool. Trust me on this. You HAVE to be comfortable or you’re gonna get whooped on the glass.
- glass shade mid day, don’t go back to camp till dark
- glass slow. If you think you’ve looked at everything, look five more times and then twice more after that
- it’s really boring until it’s not

It’s by far my favorite type of hunting. Have fun
I just upgraded my tripod a few days ago from a shorter height Outdoorsman’s to a Revic carbon bipod. I packed a pad in my pack for my rear end, but I’m seriously considering the stool / chair idea. 👍🏻
Thanks!
DAB18964-DA9A-4E3F-AA2F-33D537C06509.jpeg
 

Old_Cohntr6

Member
Messages
39
Tripod, great glass and a butt pad.
I know that is more than one tip but a great glassing point is key and patience helps!.
Jeff
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
I’m getting excited with the hunt rapidly approaching & starting to feel the pressure with everyone placing emphasis on how hard these suckers can be to glass up. I’m the only experienced hunter in my group, so I know our success will fall on my shoulders & my ability to locate deer. I’m hoping that after putting eyes on a few, they will become easier to pick out. 🤞🏼
 

BrianID

Very Active Member
Messages
1,955
Great advice already given. I'll also say they are much more difficult to glass than you would expect. It is much easier to spot mule deer and elk than coues deer. I tell new coues hunters I'm with to glass like they are trying to spot a coyote. They are called grey ghosts for a reason. They will suddenly appear and then vanish as soon as you take your eyes off them. If you see coues on a section of a hillside or saddle, it is likely a good place to see coues deer in the future.

You mentioned one of the areas you were going to look at was a river bottom. In general river bottoms are not high density coues areas. River bottoms are often excellent places to find western whitetail but coues are different. In all the units I've hunted with coues, the river bottoms hold mule deer but you will see few or no coues in them.

Make sure your new hunters can set up and shoot well in field conditions. There is a good chance you will have a coues buck at 300 yards and they will be slow to get in a solid shooting position and may have difficulty finding the coues in their scope. They can also be difficult to find after the shot. Make sure you can locate to exact spot they went down.
 

3TOE

Very Active Member
Messages
1,259
Great advice already given. I'll also say they are much more difficult to glass than you would expect. It is much easier to spot mule deer and elk than coues deer. I tell new coues hunters I'm with to glass like they are trying to spot a coyote. They are called grey ghosts for a reason. They will suddenly appear and then vanish as soon as you take your eyes off them. If you see coues on a section of a hillside or saddle, it is likely a good place to see coues deer in the future.

You mentioned one of the areas you were going to look at was a river bottom. In general river bottoms are not high density coues areas. River bottoms are often excellent places to find western whitetail but coues are different. In all the units I've hunted with coues, the river bottoms hold mule deer but you will see few or no coues in them.

Make sure your new hunters can set up and shoot well in field conditions. There is a good chance you will have a coues buck at 300 yards and they will be slow to get in a solid shooting position and may have difficulty finding the coues in their scope. They can also be difficult to find after the shot. Make sure you can locate to exact spot they went down.
I hope I’m able to lock in on glassing them fairly quick. I have had several people tell me how difficult they can be to spot.

As for the riverbed, I received some intel from a personal friend & some locals that hunt the adjoining unit on the other side of the riverbed that only hunt that area & do well in there. I selected a few spots a good distance from the nearest road that I will probably focus on for a few evening hunts.
My OnX map is littered with areas that I marked all over the unit to check out. I plan to scout / hunt a different area each morning & evening until we either harvest or locate one that we want to stay after.

I have had them both out shooting a good bit. Probably up to 6 or 7 times now. My nephew shoots very well out to 400 off of a bench. We just started shooting off of a tripod last weekend & they both did great out to 300.
After the shot, I told them both that one person would stay on the glass to help walk us in on the recovery.
 

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