What kind of bird is this?

Founder

Founder Since 1999
Messages
10,422
Anyone know what bird this is?

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OutdoorWriter

Long Time Member
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6,264
Sandhills migrate all the way from northern Canada down to the deserts in AZ & elsewhere like the Bosque del Apache in NM. So you're liable to see them resting anywhere in between.

When I was hunting caribou in the NWT, we saw 1000s of them, and the same on my moose hunt in northern BC. At the latter, a big flock would stop on a tundra covered hill top & spend the night, then leave in the morning. And boy, do they make a racket, both when flying over & while feeding.

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EVILNR

Very Active Member
Messages
1,158
Used to see a lot of them when i lived in Central FL.
They loved subdivisions and golf courses.
Dumb as a sack of rocks, could kill em with a baseball bat.
 

Bluehair

Long Time Member
Messages
4,336
This is like one of those threads where the birdwatchers document their sightings. :)

Put me down for Dolores County; 8000’ ish. They do have a cool call. I was struck by how tall they are.
 

wytex

Active Member
Messages
793
Wait til you spook a pair trying to sneak across a meadow, they will do a scraping run while calling, loud enough to alert the whole area.
They like the high mountain meadows , we've seen them at 9,000 ft.
 

Blank

Long Time Member
Messages
4,077
We call them "damn side hill cranes"! Run into them all the time at 7-9000 feet while bow hunting elk here in Idaho. Scare the crap out of you in the dark, especially in grizzly country.
 

BIGJOHNT

Long Time Member
Messages
5,010
We had a pair in front of our cabin this year at 9500 feet. You could hear them coming in for a landing at Seven mile creek. They are loud. But pretty cool to see and listen to.
 

gundog2

Active Member
Messages
153
The Cornell Lab, All About Birds website has great information about the Sandhill crane. I assume the common name comes from the Sandhills of Nebraska, where extremely large flocks often stage during migration. I have been near large flocks where the trumpeting was overwhelming.
 
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