For Sale Winchester model 70 30-06

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
Selling a nice Winchester model 70 in 30-06. 24" barrel with Talley base/rings. Has an aftermarket stock. Bluing is very clean as is the stock. Has the usual dents and dings from handling but overall very nice shape for a 1950/1951 production gun. Have only fired around 40 rounds through it but 1" groups at 100 yards was not difficult to achieve.

If you are close enough (im in NE Ohio), I would be interested in shotgun shot/powder/primers as partial trade. $1500 delivered in a hard case.
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DH56

Active Member
Messages
821
I have had one since the late 70's. It's still in vey good original condition and shoots well. NE Ohio? Same here- good luck on the sale.
 

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
I have had one since the late 70's. It's still in vey good original condition and shoots well. NE Ohio? Same here- good luck on the sale.

Between Dad and I we have 6 pre 64s not to mention the ones we've sold. It is IMO almost impossible to buy an action today that has the feel of these old guns. I cringe when I feel a 700 action compared to shooting the pre 64 model 70s.......
 

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
You and your rifle are going to live a long happy life together. 😂

Probably right. The new age hunter likes the 6.5 Needmore and any platform that looks like a sniper rifle. Any old gun like this.....most "hunters" wouldn't recognize the Parker and Hale style wood. If nothing else it'll make a good Pawn Shop piece some day :ROFLMAO:
 

Sparks Shooter

Active Member
Messages
294
While collector value is absolutely a factor, I love to see these old guns altered enough to have no collector value so people will actually take them out to the field and enjoy the fine machines that they are. All of my pre-64's are hunting guns and I don't care about collector value at all......including my 300 Magnum and 257 Roberts. ------SS
 

Homer

Long Time Member
Messages
12,139
While collector value is absolutely a factor, I love to see these old guns altered enough to have no collector value so people will actually take them out to the field and enjoy the fine machines that they are. All of my pre-64's are hunting guns and I don't care about collector value at all......including my 300 Magnum and 257 Roberts. ------SS
buy it then....
 

deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,641
While collector value is absolutely a factor, I love to see these old guns altered enough to have no collector value so people will actually take them out to the field and enjoy the fine machines that they are. All of my pre-64's are hunting guns and I don't care about collector value at all......including my 300 Magnum and 257 Roberts. ------SS
Collector value and interest has softened for Pre-64 model 70's for two main reasons:
Reason 1-
Pre-64's didn't become sought after due to rarity like many collectable guns it was because post-64 model 70's were seen as inferior to the pre-1964 Winchesters. Winchester made cost cutting efforts to stay competitive in the market (the Remington 700 was it's main competition at the time and could be manufactured cheaper and easier) changes included eliminating the mauser style claw extractor for a two piece push-feed bolt, cheaper bottom metal and other changes in barrel and receiver manufacturing methods.
Newer model 70 Winchesters "Classic model 70's" went back to the Pre'64 style extractor in the early '90's and manufacturing quality also went up. The introduction of these new model 70's coincided with the peak of Pre-64 model 70 prices. Now for the first time you could buy a similar rifle new in the box and a lot of people started going this route instead of chasing old Winchesters at gun shows(pre-internet made it harder to find a particular rifle). There were still the cheaper push feed model 70's being made at the time for price conscious buyers these were mostly the "shadow" model 70 Walmart specials.

and Reason 2-
Besides the fact that the pre-64 model 70 was now competing against itself with the newer "classic" model 70, the generation of shooters and hunters that propped up the pre-64 by paying a premium are now aging and no longer buying rifles but rather selling them or giving them to younger family members. Todays firearm buyers are not as interested in older firearms but rather newer models and custom built rifles. Like anything else in a free-market when there is less competition for a product the price has to drop for it to sell.

Pre-64 collectors are a small niche of today's buyers and for a pre-64 model 70 to have any value as a "collector" it must be complete and all original and that includes the original finish and stock. These guns still bring high prices to collectors especially rare models like a pre-64 .300 win mag that came out in 1963 so it was only produced that year. Otherwise an altered Pre-64's value is as a higher quality shooters rifle. If you know where to look you can buy non-original pre-64 shooter grade rifles in the $800-$900 range. That doesn't mean people aren't pricing them according to what they were bringing several decades ago but if they do sell at that asking price it is usually by an uninformed buyer who heard that "pre-64's" are valuable so they better buy it.

In 2006 Winchester closed its doors and stopped production in New Haven claiming that Union labor costs made it once again impossible to compete in the market. There was a big run on Model 70's at the time and people bought as many as they could find thinking they would be a great investment. As a retailer I bought all I could find from distributors and they sold as soon as they came in. That buying spree lasted a couple years until word got out that model 70's were being made again and found to be even better quality than the New Haven Winchesters.
The truth is, as nice as the Pre-64 actions are there has never been a better built Model 70 since FN took over production in 2007.

For the record I am a lover of Winchester rifles. They are my first choice. My first job selling firearms started in 1990 in a store that specializes in Pre-64 Winchesters and other older collectable guns(Collector's Supply in St. George, owned by Hondo Rondo). My first centerfire rifle was a push-feed model 70 Winchester Westerner in 30-06 I bought as a kid. I paid $325 in 1987 and that included a hard case and 3-9 Bushnell sportview scope:). I still have that rifle but it has been rebarreled to a 30-06 Ackley, it has the original stock which still bares the dings and scratches from the time it went sailing out the window of my new ford Ranger in 1990. I rolled the truck end over end out by Motoqua trying to get a couple hours of deer hunting in after work. It still had a tiny piece of gravel imbedded into the stock until it worked it's way out a couple years ago. This rifle had no collector value at any time in it's life but it has value to my kids because that beat up stock and scratched receiver reminds them of stories that I have told them.
 

tracker12

Very Active Member
Messages
1,377
Great post there and spot on. There was a time when I had 15 Pre 64 guns. Its crazy how the market for them have fallen. But your reasons are spot on. I moved on from collecting and now have 3 left that I hunt with.
 

ElmerFudd

Very Active Member
Messages
2,178
I really don't care what my Model 70s are worth. It's not going to be me selling them and whoever that is, my wife or kids, what they get is better than nothing. Hopefully it is enough to bury me and have some leftover to have some fun!
 

deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,641
I really don't care what my Model 70s are worth. It's not going to be me selling them and whoever that is, my wife or kids, what they get is better than nothing. Hopefully it is enough to bury me and have some leftover to have some fun!
Same sentiments exactly. Actually the cheaper they are the easier it is to get more of them. Wives usually sell them and some kids just don't get the bug for it. Hopefully you've got some that will appreciate them, use them and pass them on themselves one day.:)
 

ElmerFudd

Very Active Member
Messages
2,178
Back to the original post, my guess is that the stock is inletted and finished from a Richards Micro-Fit Monte Carlo style blank. Just a FYI.
 

LaGriz55

Member
Messages
70
Deadibob,
Loved your post as I too am a huge fan of the Model 70's. I agree that the Portugal FN built Featherweight that I purchased new for my Grandson in 2019 is a fine rifle. Chambered in .308 Win it shoots well and groups three different bullet weights decently with the same 100 yard zero. I find this to be highly unusual.

My 2 pre-64's are chambered in two hard to find calibers. The "Jewel" a 1955 Featherweight in .358 Win is the most valuable and most dear to me. Because of modifications it probably has little collector value. Previous owner bobbed the barrel to 19", shortened the LOP and installed a "Marvel" compass in the pistol grip of a fine French walnut stock. I had it fitted with a grind-2-fit recoil pad, then scoped it with a Leica 1.75X6X32mm scope on Warren mounts. Rifle is a delight carry and hunt the deep woods with. My pet load is a 200 grain TTSX load at 2450 fps (extrapolated) resulting in consistent groups of + or - 1".

My other M-70 was a rescue project. I found a 1948-49 manufacture classic in .30-06. I paid what was reasonable at the time and then made my modifications. The barreled action was sent to JES in Oregon for re-bore. My smith insists they did a fine job with a pre-COVID turnaround of less then 3 weeks. Now chambered in .338-06 the rifle is all I hoped it could be. The LOP was shortened with a Grind-2-fit pad installed. My smith also lightened the stock somewhat and swapped out the very warn steel for aluminum bottom metal from a doner FWT. Additionally, he milled a little material off the bold knob knurling it some in the process. We scoped the rifle with a light weight 2X7X36mm Kahles scope mounted in QD warren bases and rings. The more I shoot it the better it seems to group. Although it's now (1/2#) lighter then original, recoil is quite tolerable. Still far from a Mt. Rifle in its present condition, I opted to keep the plain walnut stock (keeping costs down) and don't regret the decision. I do however, wish it was a featherweight to begin with. It still has some heft at around 8# and that probably helps limit the felt recoil. My last 100 yard group was the best ever. A "clover leaf" with 3 shots all touching. The Nosler custom load is pushing a 200 grain AccuBond at a reported 2800 fps. Hopefully good elk medicine for me this fall!

Like Deadibob I won't be selling either rifle any time soon. I would not hold back if you find one in your favorite caliber. I had no issues hunting with these or modifying them. The 30-06 being very common was only in fair shape, I didn't feel like I was altering a classic or committing an act of sacrilege. In the case of the .358 FWT, I must plead insanity as I'm just too fond of it to leave it in a gun safe.

Good hunting everyone!
LaGriz
 

deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,641
Deadibob,
Loved your post as I too am a huge fan of the Model 70's. I agree that the Portugal FN built Featherweight that I purchased new for my Grandson in 2019 is a fine rifle. Chambered in .308 Win it shoots well and groups three different bullet weights decently with the same 100 yard zero. I find this to be highly unusual.

My 2 pre-64's are chambered in two hard to find calibers. The "Jewel" a 1955 Featherweight in .358 Win is the most valuable and most dear to me. Because of modifications it probably has little collector value. Previous owner bobbed the barrel to 19", shortened the LOP and installed a "Marvel" compass in the pistol grip of a fine French walnut stock. I had it fitted with a grind-2-fit recoil pad, then scoped it with a Leica 1.75X6X32mm scope on Warren mounts. Rifle is a delight carry and hunt the deep woods with. My pet load is a 200 grain TTSX load at 2450 fps (extrapolated) resulting in consistent groups of + or - 1".

My other M-70 was a rescue project. I found a 1948-49 manufacture classic in .30-06. I paid what was reasonable at the time and then made my modifications. The barreled action was sent to JES in Oregon for re-bore. My smith insists they did a fine job with a pre-COVID turnaround of less then 3 weeks. Now chambered in .338-06 the rifle is all I hoped it could be. The LOP was shortened with a Grind-2-fit pad installed. My smith also lightened the stock somewhat and swapped out the very warn steel for aluminum bottom metal from a doner FWT. Additionally, he milled a little material off the bold knob knurling it some in the process. We scoped the rifle with a light weight 2X7X36mm Kahles scope mounted in QD warren bases and rings. The more I shoot it the better it seems to group. Although it's now (1/2#) lighter then original, recoil is quite tolerable. Still far from a Mt. Rifle in its present condition, I opted to keep the plain walnut stock (keeping costs down) and don't regret the decision. I do however, wish it was a featherweight to begin with. It still has some heft at around 8# and that probably helps limit the felt recoil. My last 100 yard group was the best ever. A "clover leaf" with 3 shots all touching. The Nosler custom load is pushing a 200 grain AccuBond at a reported 2800 fps. Hopefully good elk medicine for me this fall!

Like Deadibob I won't be selling either rifle any time soon. I would not hold back if you find one in your favorite caliber. I had no issues hunting with these or modifying them. The 30-06 being very common was only in fair shape, I didn't feel like I was altering a classic or committing an act of sacrilege. In the case of the .358 FWT, I must plead insanity as I'm just too fond of it to leave it in a gun safe.

Good hunting everyone!
LaGriz
I've changed my attitude towards fine and expensive firearms. Life is too short to leave any gun in the safe. I don't care if it's a six figure Holland & Holland, hunt and shoot with it. There isn't much joy of ownership when they are just locked away. I have a buddy with a .338-06 Ackley and he's claiming close to .338 win mag factory velocities. It's a tempting cartridge for sure.
 

GilaJeff

Active Member
Messages
353
While collector value is absolutely a factor, I love to see these old guns altered enough to have no collector value so people will actually take them out to the field and enjoy the fine machines that they are. All of my pre-64's are hunting guns and I don't care about collector value at all......including my 300 Magnum and 257 Roberts. ------SS
I have two pre-64's...one in 257 WBY Mag in a McMillan stock with a Pac-Nor barrel, it is cerakoted in OD green. The other is a 30-06 with a Lyman peep sight, matte-finished in a McMillan sporter stock. I love both those non-collector Pre-64's. I hunt with them.
 

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
I have two pre-64's...one in 257 WBY Mag in a McMillan stock with a Pac-Nor barrel, it is cerakoted in OD green. The other is a 30-06 with a Lyman peep sight, matte-finished in a McMillan sporter stock. I love both those non-collector Pre-64's. I hunt with them.

I've got an old Eddystone (I think it's an American Enfield model 1917?) with a Lyman peep site, nice wood and is a tack driver! Also in 30-06. Deserves a scope but the peep site is so sweet I hate to drill and tap it.
 

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
I've changed my attitude towards fine and expensive firearms. Life is too short to leave any gun in the safe. I don't care if it's a six figure Holland & Holland, hunt and shoot with it. There isn't much joy of ownership when they are just locked away. I have a buddy with a .338-06 Ackley and he's claiming close to .338 win mag factory velocities. It's a tempting cartridge for sure.
Yup we re barreled a pre 64 06 to 338-06 as well. Haven't got to shoot it yet but I'm sure it'll be great.
 

ElmerFudd

Very Active Member
Messages
2,178
I have a semi butchered M70 (54xxx) with side mount holes, the sandblasting polished off and the bolt handle shape changed a bit. I'm going back and forth between a fast twist semi tactical 6.5-06 or lightweight classic 338-06. I have a nice classic style stock blank if I go the latter
 

LaGriz55

Member
Messages
70
ElmerFudd,
The 338-06 or the 338-06AI are both capable of near .338 Win mag performance. Just do the math on a 200 gr. AccuBond at 2800 fps. Recoil sensitive shooters can get this terminal energy without the brutal slam of a magnum. Suggest you remove the steel butt plate and install a quality pad. In a standard length action you could get the weight down to a comfortable carry level. Is your rifle a Featherweight model? Replacement stocks can be found at a reasonable price.

The possible choice of a 6.5-06 (interesting) tells me you might load your own ammo. As yet I still don't. While shooting the only factory load in the 338-06 although accurate, I find the Nosler Custom ammo quite pricey. Consider the .280 AI if looking for something in this style, as you can find some quality factory loads. Unlike the .280 AI, my standard .280 Rem. ammo is hard to locate or nonexistent. Both cartridges are underrated IMHO.

Good Luck with your build!
LaGriz
 

deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,641
I have a semi butchered M70 (54xxx) with side mount holes, the sandblasting polished off and the bolt handle shape changed a bit. I'm going back and forth between a fast twist semi tactical 6.5-06 or lightweight classic 338-06. I have a nice classic style stock blank if I go the latter
My next one will be a 6.5-06 or 6.5-06 ackley. I've got the medium bores covered pretty well with the .338 winny and .375 H&H ackley so the .338-06 can wait but I need a long range small bore like the 6.5; Leaning towards just the standard 6.5-06 also in a 26" fast twist barrel. It will be on a model 70 action unless I find a good deal on a mauser action first.:)
 

Lhedrick1

Active Member
Messages
745
My next one will be a 6.5-06 or 6.5-06 ackley. I've got the medium bores covered pretty well with the .338 winny and .375 H&H ackley so the .338-06 can wait but I need a long range small bore like the 6.5; Leaning towards just the standard 6.5-06 also in a 26" fast twist barrel. It will be on a model 70 action unless I find a good deal on a mauser action first.:)

You could hunt 95%+ of game with a 6.5-06 and 300 win mag. I have a Remington 700 that got rebarrled to 6.5-06 sometime in its life and I honestly don't know why the Creedmoor is even talked about anymore. Easy to load, plenty fast and brass is easily available and/or made. Great cartridge.
 
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deadibob

Very Active Member
Messages
2,641
You could hunt 95%+ of game with a 6.5-06 and 300 win mag. I have a Remington 700 that got rebarrled to 6.5-06 sometime in its life and I honestly don't know why the Creedmoor is even talked about anymore. Easy to load, plenty fast and brass is easily available and/or made. Great cartridge.
The only thing the creedmore has going for it over most other 6.5's is that it works well in AR-10's. It can be argued that it has had one of the most successful marketing campaigns in the history of the hunting/shooting industry and that all started with magazine article hype.

Even though the Creedmore works in an AR-10 well I would still choose the .260 Remington over it for two reasons:

1-Brass is easily and cheaply formed from .308 winchester brass.

2-I'm not a chump or a Lemming and I know enough about firearms and ballistics to know the difference between
hyperbole and function.


On the flipside this has probably become the most hijacked post ever in the Monstermuleys classifieds. Sorry about that OP. It might be best to repost your Winchester.;)
 

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