Bipod or Tripod shooting stick?

bonepicker

Active Member
I have a single leg shooting stick (monopod I guess you'd call it) and I have used it for my boys the last few years and it has been helpful but they have struggled to hold it steady left/right. They have both taken bucks with it but I have had to help hold the stick steady for the shot (which has been cool in its own way) I found the monopod in the woods a few years ago so it has a few issues and it is time to replace it. I am wanting to get one similar to it (a Primos) just in the Bipod or Tripod version. What do you guys recommend? Is it worth the cost and awkwardness for the third leg or is two sufficient? We aren't planning to make any 400-500 yard shots, just something to help them the next few years until their arm strength and confidence improves and something for my daughter who will be 12 next year and will have her first tag.
Thanks!
 

BGbasbhat

Active Member
If they're shooting off-hand, the more stability the better. 1 more leg isn't gonna kill you (guessing you would carry it) and will provide them more stability and confidence in their shooting...not to mention potential success/fun.



"...I'd rather be tried by twelve than carried by six..."
 

BGbasbhat

Active Member
You may also want to think about a Bog Pod. Maybe a little less cumbersome and I think quieter. My brother in law was clanking around that aluminum Primos during my elk hunt, and I believe the Bog Pod is a plastic composite, but perfectly fine for shooting/hiking.



"...I'd rather be tried by twelve than carried by six..."
 

littlebull209338

Active Member
LAST EDITED ON Oct-11-19 AT 03:30PM (MST)[p]I have used all three types: mono.bi and tri-pod. As I have gotten older my arm strength has declined a lot and the tri=pod BOGPOD is really a great aid. I even use it in my ground blind to set up my rifle or shot gun, works great. My grand daughter hunts with me and it really helps her confidence. She has taken 8 turkeys all with the tri-pod assist.
 

HIcountryman

Active Member
i use bogpod tripod also. I really think the one and two legged things don't help... at all, really. I like to get my breathing out of the equation, back against a rock or tree if possible. I often hold forend of gun against the top of tripod leg with my first two fingers cradling gun and just a pinky or two fingers around leg of tripod. I don't use yoke on top of tripod. Mainly carrying for spotting scope.

Even a tripod won't give me a rock solid rest if the rest of my body is floating around... I practice shooting positions and steadying crosshairs or mz sights continually while hunting so there are no surprises when i need to make a shot.
 

jhibbs

Active Member
I have a primos tripod trigger stick and it works great. I like the way it is quickly adjustable and is very stable. It is a little cumbersome to carry, so rigged up a sling so that my hands are free when hiking. It also works great to steady my binoculars when glassing for long periods of time.

Jody
 

leftturnabq

Active Member
I have the Bog Pod, and my buddy has the Primos tripod TriggerStick...which I think is pretty slick.

Either way the tripod is much more solid than the bipod in sittibg or standing positions, and would be the way to go in my opinion...especially with the kids.
 

jims

Very Active Member
I try my best to get prone. If that's impossible due to brush I often use my spotting scope/tripod. I'm not sure how many antelope I've shot that way. I've been hunting whitetails the past couple years in super tall 4 to 5' tall grass and weeds. I used my spotting scope/tripod setup last year but would really like to switch over to a primos trigger stick. I like how it sets up quickly and quietly with just a pull of the trigger. It is likely another thing to add to my pack and lug around but if sitting a lot it may be worth it!
 

HIcountryman

Active Member
i had the primos trigger stick a while back and it only lasted 2 seasons before the whole thing turned into a piece o ****. They are not built to last and impossible to fix, IMO.
 

jims

Very Active Member
I bought a trigger stick and ended up returning it after trying it one day on a whitetail hunt. I found it was less stable than the spotting scope/tripod set up I mentioned in my earlier post. Why carry both!
 

tracker12

Very Active Member
It all depends on the situation but I have been using the tripod more and more these days. I have Bog Pod in both 2 and 3 legs
 

Jerry

Active Member
It all depends on the situation but I have been using the tripod more and more these days. I have Bog Pod in both 2 and 3 legs
I have a single leg shooting stick (monopod I guess you'd call it) and I have used it for my boys the last few years and it has been helpful but they have struggled to hold it steady left/right. They have both taken bucks with it but I have had to help hold the stick steady for the shot (which has been cool in its own way) I found the monopod in the woods a few years ago so it has a few issues and it is time to replace it. I am wanting to get one similar to it (a Primos) just in the Bipod or Tripod version. What do you guys recommend? Is it worth the cost and awkwardness for the third leg or is two sufficient? We aren't planning to make any 400-500 yard shots, just something to help them the next few years until their arm strength and confidence improves and something for my daughter who will be 12 next year and will have her first tag.
Thanks!
I've used a Harris Bipod now with the rotating flex to adjust for uneven terrain. Used the regular Harris for sitting & prone. Tough & absolutely reliable in any situation. Great shooting aid I've used since 1980. It turns a tough shot into a dead certain hit ! I never hunt without it on any big game. Fabulous for very deadly accurate shooting especially at long range !! 🍀🍀 Jerry Gold in Fort Collins, Colorado
 

jims

Very Active Member
I understand completely where a Harris bipod would help considerably when hunting areas with tall brush or grass. I recently started hunting whitetails in Nebraska sandhill country where grass is often 3 to 6' tall. We don't move much and spend a lot of time sitting and glassing with shots in the 100 to 400+ yard range. My Nebraska buddy loves his Harris bipod.

I used to have a Harris bipod on my rifle when a kid but as I grow older I took it off. I'm not getting any younger and I'm always searching for ways to loose weight off the gear I'm hauling up and down hills. If hiking miles upon miles in open country I can usually find a spot to lay prone and shoot off my backpack. Nebraska's tall grass hill country has been the exception where I really think a taller bipod attached to the rifle would be worth hauling around.
 

Muley

Active Member
I have no experience with them but i'm thinking a tripod will work better for your kids. It's what you see guides use for their clients.
 

Buffalo1

Member
I do a lot of practice with a 22 for months before a hunt. I did a test 1 year with all kinds of sticks, by far Tri pods won out. But like you I don't want the weight, so I made these out of 2 pair. (I will post picture later) folds up, light weight, & at least for me, by far the most accurate.
 
I have tried a few types, if you are not getting one that locks on to the gun I think you are going to have just as much wobble and jitter as you would free hand, you can can just sit there for longer. I have had the best accuracy off my knee using the frame of the pack. I understand if that's not an options but practicing with sticks is just as valuable as practicing free hand.

Just don't teach them to shoot off the bench it builds a fake sense of confidence, when the are in the field there are no benches.
 

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